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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2004 10:11 am 
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More news from Copenhagen...

Alexander Sukonnik has moved from the corps to the character dancer ranks and Erling Eliasson also joins as a character dancer.

Besides Giorgia Minella, Alba Nadal has also joined the corps de ballet.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2004 9:01 am 
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Greetings!
The last performance of 'Anna Karenina' went very smoothly, and there were several excellent performances. Mads Blangstrup and Marie-Pierre Greve, who were the original Vronsky and Anna, closed out the run with a performance that seemed to grow in intensity.

At first I felt the emotional connection between the two leads was lacking, but by the final scene the tension and pain in the relationship was palpable. And those closing scenes contain some of Ratmasnky's finest choreography - when Anna pulls away from Vronsky in the opera house lobby, the jerky, bent-limbed choreography clearly illustrates a pain so great that is ripping the her apart.

Peter Bo Bendixen also gave a solid performance as Anna's husband, Alexei Karenin. Ratmansky makes Karenin much more likeable than he is in the book, and Bendixen brings to the character a clear sense of humanity and presence.

Despite the technical glitches, the sets are superb. The sweeping projections bring to life the opulence and starkness of Tsarist Russia and the full-sized train car is visually stunning. Whether the effect is better from the center or it was not working properly on Thursday night, I was really struck by the scene of Anna's death on Saturday evening. The train car comes directly towards the audience, and as Anna throws herself in front of it, the combination of stage fog and the brightening train headlight completely envelope her, making it seem like she truely disappeared.

The main weakness of the production is it's length. At less than 2 hours in length, including a 25 minute intermission, it feels very rushed. We are swept from one scene to another, sometimes too quickly to fully absorb the emotion and keep track of the storyline. It's especially problematic at some points, because certain settings are not firmly estabished - for instance, I was never sure which location was supposed to be Vronsky's house. Adding another 15-30 minutes to the projection would not have been to much for the audience and would have allowed some part of the story to be better fleshed out - perhaps giving more time to the development of Anna & Vronsky's relationship. ( In the book they have a child and spend time in the country before the return to the city, where the critical eye of the city society fatally strain the relationship).

Rehearsals for "The Kings Guard on Amager" continue this week, in preparation for the premiere of the new production on Saturday. Also, Thomas Lund and Gudrun Bojeson are in Paris through Monday for the Gala de Etoiles

As an aside, while Blangstrup is a superb dancer and actor, it would really help if he could work with his make-up to "open up" his naturally deep-set eyes, because it often seems like he's dancing with his eyes shut (though clearly he is not !).
(Eye contact, or at least the illusion of it, is vital in creating an emotional connection - think of the scene where Romeo and Juliet first meet- it's the meeting of two sets of eyes across a crowded room that convey the instantaneous and powerful love between the couple.)


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2004 8:08 am 
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Greetings!
More rehearsals for both "Etudes" and "Kings Guard On Amager" today, and it's mostly dealing with the little details. There are some very tricky lighting cues in "Etudes" which make or break the atmosphere, and much time was spent on getting those cues exactly right.

Thomas Lund and Gudrun Bojeson are back from the Gala de Etoiles, so I presume that they will not be dancing in tonight's performance.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2004 8:44 am 
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Greetings!
The casting for 'Etudes' has been posted, but the usual warning about changes before the actual performances...

October 2: Lindstrøm, Greve, Massot, Blangstrup
October 3: Bojesen, Sakurai, Kupinski M, Blangstrup

There is also a video clip from Abdallah available on the Royal Theater website.

Kate

<small>[ 29 September 2004, 12:15 PM: Message edited by: ksneds ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 8:04 am 
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Greetings!
'Etudes' and 'Kings Guard in Amager' finally get their re-premieres tonight and it should be a lovely evening.

I've had a marvellous time here in Copenhagen over the last 10 days. The dancers have been working incredibley hard over the past two weeks to get these productions ready, and there have been ups & downs.

Tonight's debuts, of which there are many, include Peter Bo Bendixen as 'Eduoard Dupuis' and Mads Blangstrup in 'Etudes'. Tomorrow, Jean-Lucien Massot will debut in the title role of 'Kings Guards in Amager' and Kristoffer Sakurai is scheduled to debut as one of the lead men in 'Etudes'.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 2:19 pm 
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Greetings!
Quick thoughts after this evening's stellar performances.

The new production of 'Livjaegerne På Amager' is delightful, and the cast gave a charming performance. Peter Bo Bendixen is perfectly suited to the role, using his years of experience to bring the character to life and giving DuPuy an eye-twinkling, rascally charm, HIghlights were the energetic reel, led by Bendixen, Martin Stauning, Asger Schlichtkrull, Elisabeth Dam and Izabela Sokolowska, and Thomas Lund, as Otto. Lund, who helps to coach the Bournonville classes, was superb with his fast, crisp beats, elegant epaulment and high, airy jumps.

The evening concluded with a sensational performance "Etudes". This is not a company like the Kirov, where every foot and every arm is perfectly in line, and here it was the power, crispness and energy that made the performance stand out. 'Etudes' is a ballet full of images - lines of girls in tutus, light criss crossing the stage - and every step, every move is completely exposed. Gitte Lindstrøm combined power and silken smoothness, and was elegantly partnered by Mads Blangstrup in the "Sylphides" section. Kudos also to Kenneth Greve and Jean-Lucien Massot for their performances - it's a demanding ballet, and both truely rose to the occasion. The male corps, most of whom performed in both ballets were solid, and demonstrated that the RDB is equally comfortable in the classical and Bournonville styles.
Two scenes stand out in my mind...the first is when the stage is dark, save for two rays of light crossing the stage from opposite wings. Rows of men and women do fast grand jetes across the stage in the lines of light.
Also, the scene where Greve starts fouetteing alone on center stage, to be joined by a circle of femal corps who join him in the fouettes, which end in perfect (or near so) synchronization.

Bravo!!!! to the company. I look forward to seeing more debuts in the same ballets tomorrow!
Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 8:28 am 
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Greetings
Brief comments on this afternoon's performance. Due to injury, Peter Bo Bendixen was a late replacement Jean-Lucian Massot in "Kings Guard in Amager". Debuts included Silja Schandorff as Louise, Thomas Flindt Jeppesen as Steffen, Julien Ringdahl as Emil, Cecilie Lassen as Sophie and Christina Olsen as Andrea. Well done all around.

There were several cast changes in Etudes. Caroline Cavallo danced instead of Gudrun Bojeson and Kenneth Greve repeated his role, replacing the originally scheduled Marcin Kupinski. Kristoffer Sakurai made an impressive debut in one of the lead male roles, and though there were a few minor bobbles, he has great stage presence and clearly is a talent to watch. Greve was solid as the other lead male, though showed signs of the effort of dancing the role twice with less than 24 hours rest between. Mads Blangstrup was again an elegant and supportive partner in the Sylphides section and Caroline Cavallo demonstrated her stunning pirouttes in her solos.

The corps, especially the men, was a bit more ragged as the ballet proceeded, no doubt feeling the effects of performing twice in less than a day. In addition, it seemed that the orchestra was not as sharp and in synch with what was going on onstage, muddying some of the notes, which in turned seemed to muddy some of the dancing.
Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 2:07 am 
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Here, a bit late, is the press release for "Livjægerne på Amager" with my corrections to the casting.

PRESS RELEASE
The King’s Volunteers on Amager

August Bournonville’s one-act ballet will premiere in a revisited rendition under the direction of Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter and with a more austere costume and set design by Karin Betz. The ballet will feature alongside Harald Lander’s Etudes.

Premiere 2 October 8 pm at the Old Stage
Performed alongside Etudes
2 | 3 | 8 | 13 | 16 | 26 Oct.
10 | 13 Nov. 21 Dec. 2004
11 Jan. 3 | 16 Feb.

The revival of The King’s Volunteers on Amager marks a new and more colourful age of humour and sensuality for August Bournonville whose bicentenary we celebrate in 2005. In the coming season, we pay tribute to this great Danish choreographer by bringing new blood to his ballets.
This is evident in the first premiere of the season of Bournonville’s erotic carnival from 1871. Although little has changed in the story of the King’s Volunteers, who charm the local Amager girls, the performance is more visually graphic. The staging is in the hands of a new and extremely dynamic duo, director Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter, and set designer Karin Betz.
The romance and charm of the ballet has kept it alive, but the evocative sensuality of the new set design by Karin Betz, who debuts as ballet set designer, emphasises the erotic motif of the story. Karin Betz:
“People hide behind masks, yet mask are revealing. People can show new and bolder aspects of their nature.”
New features have been included in the story that renders it a more complex narrative. Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter, who also directed the ballet in 1991, has choreographed new passages – among them the humorous snowball fight between the King Volunteers and people from Amager, which was left out in earlier versions. However, despite the additional scenes, Bournonville is still Bournonville. Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter:
“The changes have been made within the framework of the overall idiom. You cannot modernise Bournonville’s step design, and you shouldn’t either.”

The premiere evening will feature Peter Bo Bendixen in the principal role as Edouard Du Puy. Peter Bo Bendixen has just started on one of his last seasons as a soloist dancer before he commences on a career as character dancer. Peter Bo Bendixen has been a soloist dancer for more than 11 years and has performed almost all principal parts within the modern and classical repertoire.
Peter Bo Bendixen has no fear of the transition from more spectacular roles to those that feature more acting. He has for several years been engaged in other activities. Apart from being Artistic Director of Principals and Soloists of the Royal Danish Ballet, which tours most of the world, he has also spent a great deal of time and energy on opening a café in the Copenhagen neighbourhood of Nørrebro.

The evening will close with one of Harald Lander’s classic ballets, Etudes, from 1948, which is one of his most demanding ballets. It is therefore only fitting that the Royal Danish Ballet should inaugurate its new ballet floor at the Old Stage, which had been donated by the Tuborg Foundation.

The King’s Volunteers on Amager
Choreography: August Bournonville
Music: Arranged and partially composed by
V.C. Holm, finale by H.C. Lumbye
Costume and set designer: Karin Betz
Director and choreographer
of new scenes: Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter
Conductor: Michael Schønwandt and Martin Åkerwall
Dramaturge: Camilla Hübbe
Lighting design: Jørn Melin

The Royal Danish Ballet
The Royal Danish Theatre Ballet School
The Royal Danish Orchestra

Cast
(Subject to change)

Premiere Saturday 2 October 8 pm
Edouard Peter Bo Bendixen
Louise Caroline Cavallo
Otto Thomas Lund
Steffen Morten Eggert
Sophie Amy Watson
Andrea Susanne Grinder

Sunday 3 October 3 pm.
Edouard Peter Bo Bendixen
Louise Silja Schandorf
Otto Thomas Lund
Steffen Thomas Flindt
Sophie Cecilie Lassen
Andrea Christina L. Olsen

Etudes
Choreographer: Harald Lander
Music: Knudåge Riisager
Set designer: Søren Frandsen
Costume designer: Kirsten Lund Nielsen
Director: Josette Amiel
Conductor: Michael Schønwandt and Martin
Åkerwall

Who were The King’s Volunteers?
The King’s Volunteer Corps was established in 1801 as a kind of home defence following the Danish defeat to the British under Lord Admiral Nelson at the Battle of Copenhagen. The Volunteers were recruited from higher social circles and a number of civil servants and artists at the Royal Danish Theatre were members of the corps, including August Bournonville’s father, Antoine Bournonville, and Lieutenant Edouard Du Puy. Today the corps is called The Home Guard Corps 6110, The King’s Volunteers, and is based at the old city ramparts Kastellet where one of their tasks is to take good care of visitors to the open-air performance of the Royal Danish Ballet.

<small>[ 07 October 2004, 09:14 AM: Message edited by: ksneds ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2004 7:02 am 
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Greetings!
The groundbreaking for the new theatre in Copenhagen took place yesterday. The theatre, which is scheduled to open in 2008, will complete the trio of theatres which will house opera, ballet and drama.

Quote:
The Associated Press

Wednesday, October 6, 2004
(10-06) 23:15 PDT COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) --

Less than a week after a billionaire donated a new opera house to the Danish government, Culture Minister Brian Mikkelsen held a groundbreaking ceremony for the construction of the Royal Theater's new $123 million playhouse.
Click here for more.

[url


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2004 7:07 am 
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The Copenhagen Post reports on the new opera house:

Quote:
Møller-Maersk, Denmark's leading industrial concern, has now officially handed over Europe's newest opera house to the Danish government, paving the way for the Royal Opera Company to move into its new premises this autumn

Copenhagen's brand new opera house is located on a prime site on the harbour front facing the Royal Palace, and is now all set to open in good time for its formal inauguration in January, with French-Italian tenor Roberto Alagna signed up to perform in the opening production, Verdi's 'Aida.' The building is a gift to the nation from a foundation set up by Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller, 91-year-old chairman of Denmark's biggest industrial group the oil and shipping Møller-Maersk concern, owner of the world's biggest container line and major participant in Denmark's North Sea oil and gas exploitation.
Click here for more.


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2004 11:53 am 
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Reviews of 'Anna Karenina' and 'Livjægerne på Amager'/'Etudes'...enjoy!

“Anna Karenina”
The Royal Danish Ballet
September 23 and 25, 2004
The Royal Theatre, Gamle Scene

The first month of the Royal Danish Ballet’s 2004-05 season concluded with the final two performances of Alexei Ratmansky’s “Anna Karenina”. Leo Tolstoy’s novel about love and politics in Tsarist Russia, on which the ballet is based, is quite lengthy and Ratmansky wisely chose to focus solely on the love story between Anna Karenina and Count Vronsky. His production combines Wendall Harrington’s massive projections, Rodion Shchedrin’s dramatic, throbbing music with powerful choreography to bring the emotional story to the stage. It’s an approach that is captivating, but not always successful, and the performances on Thursday and Saturday evenings highlighted productions strengths and weaknesses.

Eschewing the elaborate sets that are so often the mainstay of story ballets, Ratmansky brings the lavish upper-class society of Tsarist Russia to life in a series of larger than life images projected onto a cyclorama. These projections are complimented by sparse, but elegant sets. The piece de resistance is a full-sized train car, which spins around – courtesy of two golf cart engines and the deft manipulations of two offstage “pilots” on remote controls - to reveal a fully decorated interior, and slides off in clouds of stage smoke.

All of these dramatic effects come together in a faced paced production which races from scene to scene. Unfortunately on Thursday night, the set and speed conspired against each other, when the train station set got momentarily stuck, disrupting the flow of the ballet, most obviously visible in the slightly chaotic nature of the following officer’s dance. The evening never really recovered from this early misstep, despite fine dancing and dramatic performances, especially those of Marie-Pierre Greve (Anna), Mads Blangstrup (Vronsky) and Peter Bo Bendixen (Karenin).

This technical glitch hinted at one of the main weakness of the production - it's length. At less than two hours in length, including a 25-minute intermission, the ballet feels very rushed. We are swept from one scene to another, sometimes too quickly to fully absorb the emotion and keep track of the storyline. It's especially problematic at some points, because certain settings are not firmly established. Adding another 15-30 minutes to the production would not have been too much for the audience and would have allowed some part of the story to be better fleshed.

However, the problems that plagued Thursday’s performance did not emerge on Saturday, and the performance served as an elegant season farewell to the ballet and was witness to a number of high quality performances. Bringing the character of Anna Karenina to stage is a challenging task, for she is both incredibly strong and painfully weak at the same time. This duality shone through in Marie-Pierre Greve’s fine interpretation, and she was most moving as the fragile, brittle Anna who seems to be literally breaking apart as she pushes Vronsky away for the final time.
Blangstrup’s Vronsky is more introspective, his true emotions only breaking through in a dramatic solo which highlighted Blangstrup’s impressive, but controlled multiple pirouettes and sinuous body. The choreography for Karenin is perhaps less intriguing, but Peter Bo Bendixen succeeded in bringing humanity to a character who, in the Tolstoy’s novel, has much less to recommend him as a person. Bendixen’s performance highlighted the conflicting forces in Karenin’s life – love, business and the accepted morals of the society in which he lived. At point Ratmansky’s choreography has Karenin moving from simple pacing to a frenzied near-run around the stage, and there is the slightest inkling that the man is torn not just by how he thinks society will view him, but by a thread of love for his wife.

Konstantin Liovin, the man who’s proposal of marriage is rebuffed by Anna’s sister, is a major character in the book, but barely acknowledged in the ballet. However, Cedric Lambrette, who stepped into the role for the final performance, made the brief rejection scene crispy poignant, setting the mood for the events that would follow.

Ratmansky’s ballet is a more than respectable attempt to bring a long and complicated story to the ballet stage and demonstrates his ability to transfer emotion and context into ballet. With this success in hand, one hopes that ‘Anna Karenina” will not be his last collaboration with the Royal Danish Ballet. Martin Åkerwall conducted the Royal Danish Orchestra, with Mikael Melbye the designer of the sets and costumes.

“Livjægerne på Amager" and “Etudes"
The Royal Danish Ballet
October 2 and 3, 2004
The Royal Theatre, Gamle Scene

On Saturday, two classic Danish ballets re-entered the Royal Danish Ballet repertory in a richly stunning evening of dance. The program opened with the first major revival of this Bournonville Festival season, Anne Marie Vessel Schlüter’s new production of August Bournonville’s classic “Livjægerne på Amager” (loosely translated as the ‘King’s Volunteers on Amager’). Complimenting this lighthearted tale of love and flirtation was Hal Landers’ fiendishly technical, but visually stunning “Etudes”.

Brought back to the Royal Theatre’s Gamle Scene in anticipation of next year’s Bournonville Festival, “Livjægerne på Amager” is the story of the flirtatious Edouard Du Puy, a lieutenant in the king’s volunteer guard. Amid the Shrovetide Festivities out on the island of Amager where he is billeted, Du Puy woos the local girls, but is eventually realizes the error of his ways after his wife comes to visit and partake in the festivities in disguise. The character of Du Puy is based on real man, the Swiss-born Edouard Dupuis, a violinist, conductor and singer who performed at the Royal Theatre while Bournonville was alive. Though Bournonville’s plays with the facts of Dupuis’ life, the ballet is an intriguing historical record of Amager at the turn of the 19th Century.

To create a fictional world faithful to Amager’s rich history, set and costume designer Karin Betz’s conducted intensive research, the results of which are obvious in the charming costumes and sets. Betz works with a limited palette primary colors and the country folk of Amager are dressed in ‘homespun’ black with wonderful detailing in blues, yellows and reds, while Edouard’s wife and her friends, upper class ladies from Copenhagen, are clad in organdy of vivid shades of deep orange. Tønne’s cozy house, where the action is centered, is enclosed by deep red rafters, and small back-piece, which provides a doorway into the house. The lush countryside beyond is illustrated by large projections.

Yet, it is the dancers who breathe the real life into this charming Bournonville ballet. Peter Bo Bendixen, who danced the role of Du Puy in the premiere and in place of the injured Jean-Lucien Massot on Sunday, created a very human character, a man who was a dashing, and flirtatious, but still believably contrite when confronted by his wife. It is an ideal role for Bendixen, who has developed into both an eloquent and earthy character dancer and solid partner. In one of Schlüter’s new additions in this production, a dream-scene pas de cinq for Du Puy and four beautiful maidens, Bendixen’s solid partnering allowed the dancing to be beautifully smooth, each lift gliding along.

Both Caroline Cavallo on Saturday and Silja Schandorff on Sunday were touching and appropriately elegant as Du Puy’s wife Louise, who disguises herself to teach her wayward husband a lesson. The trickery at the festivities ends when she peels away her mask and Edouard realizes he’s been flirting with his own wife. Schandorff in particular was a master of timing, flirting coyly with her husband, and dropping her fan at Du Puy’s feet just as he leans in to kiss one of the local girls.

A high-flying Otto, Thomas Lund once again demonstrated why he is among the finest Bournonville technicians of his generation. Though somewhat dwarfed by his partners in the pas de trois – including Cecilie Lassen who stood out on Sunday, Lund soared in his solos, his feet flashing in crisp, quick beats. As the red-cheeked Trine, one of the two local maids who flirt with Edouard, Elisabeth Dam stood out for her complete and believable immersion in the character. Also of note were the good-natured performances of Frederik Farrington, Martin Stauning and Dawid Kupinski as the local boys, Jan and Dirk.
Adding human depth and life to the ballet were the energetic corps, who soared through the various character dances during the final festivities, set to music by Mozart, Lumbye, Holm and Dupuis himself, and the many talented character dancers who fleshed out the older characters. In particular, Kirsten Simone and Jette Buchwald gave two very different, but equally valid interpretations of Bodil, the wife of Tønnes. Buchwald’s Bodil was firm and sharp, a sharp slap of the table rousing Tønnes to prepare for the festivities, while Simone was firm, but in a more patient, knowing way, her power gained from age and seniority.

A world away from the giddy "Livjægerne på Amager", Harald Lander’s "Etudes" is an unadorned display of classical ballet. Carl Czerny’s etudes, arranged by Knudåge Riisager are used in the teaching of piano students, and "Etudes" is in itself, a ballet class on stage. A lone ballerina emerges from the curtain to demonstrate the five basic ballet steps, and then the curtains part to reveal lines of black and white tutu clad ballerinas at the barre. The ballet is both fiendishly difficult and visually stunning, with lighting effects that highlight the movements of the bodies across the stage. In one section, the ballerinas at the barre are lit to that they appear as crisp black figures against a light blue backdrop, in another dancers speedily jete across pathways of light that cross diagonally from wing to wing. In all the scenes, former Paris Opera Ballet dancer Josette Amiel’s painstaking and precise coaching, was obvious in the crisp and confident nature of the dancing. While the dancing was not without the occasional stray arm or leg, the dancers performed with a nearly uniform timing and power, wrists flicking in one dramatic moment, the male corps jumping as one in the beats.

Making her debut as the ballerina on Saturday, Gitte Lindstrøm was serenely elegant as the Sylph and feisty in the powerful folk-dance influenced finale. The following afternoon, Caroline Cavallo was a more youthfully kinetic ballerina, showing off her fast precise spins and fearless jumps. A handsome and attentive partner in the Sylphide section, Mads Blangstrup also debuted in his role on Saturday evening. That same night, Kenneth Greve and Jean-Lucien Massot powered through the male solos, their performances determined and focused. Greve, who replaced the injured Marcin Kupinski on Sunday, was especially impressive in both the long series of fouettes and the folk-dance influenced final, but was understandably in the second performance of the weekend.
Sharing the stage with Greve on Sunday was the talented Kristoffer Sakurai, in yet another major debut. Though there were a few minor bobbles in his performance, Sakurai danced with a refreshing energy, joy and relief evident in the occasional wide smile. It’s a difficult role, and the quality of Sakurai’s debut performance suggests that with more time and practice, even better performances are to come!

As whole, the corps was excellent, but looked a bit more tired and haphazard on Sunday afternoon. At least part of the problem appeared to lie in a less precisely played performance by the Royal Danish Orchestra – the music, and especially the tempo is an integral part of “Etudes” and with the orchestra meandering, the dancers seemed to lose their bearings onstage. Martin Åkerwall conducted on Saturday, Michael Schønwandt on Sunday.

<small>[ 09 October 2004, 01:55 PM: Message edited by: ksneds ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2004 1:30 pm 
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Just a few notes on Anna Karenina:
I agree it can feel a bit rushed, especially the first time you see it, and you feel it could be a bit longer. Rodion Shchedrin’s fine score is only 80 minutes long and I doubt he would want to do any additions or changes to it. Apart from the technical problem on the 23rd I think there hasn't been any before. I have seen most of the 20 performances. Marie-Pierre Greve and Mads Blangstrup was my favourite pair.


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2004 8:11 am 
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Hi!
Thanks for posting! It's nice to have some different "faces" on this thread!
This was definately not the first time there have been problems with the set, which is not surprising given the quick changes and dramatic size of the set.

As to the length - it is not unusual for scores to be amended or for other music to be added in order to add length. 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' is an excellent example. I also seem to remember a comment by Ratmansky in an article or interview that seemed to indicate that he kept it short out of concern for audience attention span. Out of curiousity, does anyone know how long Plisetskaya's version of "Anna Karenina", for which her husband originally wrote the score, was?

I too really like Mads Blangstrup and Marie-Pierre Greve, but only saw Bowman & Cavallo during rehearsals, so it's hard to compare. It would have been nice to see Ananiashvili's performance in the ballet though - it seems like a role that plays to her strengths.

As to the recent cast changes, Jean-Lucien Massot's absence from Livjægerne på Amager on October 3rd was because of injury. He actually was sitting down the row from me during the peformance. The casting switches in 'Etudes' have also been due to injury and/or illness.

As a note, the casting that is on the RDB website is usually not changed once its posted, so is frequently not up-to-date.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2004 11:05 am 
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Plisetskaya's Anna Karenina was not different in length, 80 minutes.


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 Post subject: Re: Royal Danish Ballet: 2004-2005
PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2004 11:38 am 
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Paris Opera étoile, Mathieu Ganio, will be dancing two performances of Etudes oct. 13th and oct. 16th.

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