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 Post subject: BRB "Tombeaux" Mixed Bill 2002
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2002 12:58 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2001 12:01 am
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Location: London
Enchantment in the inky twilight

Ismene Brown reviews Tombeaux, Sanctum and Faade performed by the Birmingham Royal Ballet at the Birmingham Hippodrome

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THEY used to call the programming of ballet mixed bills "meat and two veg". A good evening of ballet is all about variety of tastes and textures, and David Bintley, director of Birmingham Royal Ballet, is rather good at compiling the menu.
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Birmingham Royal Ballet
by Donald Hutera
Dance
Birmingham Hippodrome



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MIXED bills are notoriously hard to sell. Most programmes aim for variety, yet sometimes strain to justify grouping particular works together. Birmingham Royal Ballet’s current triple bill, which opened at the Hippodrome on Wednesday, has an easier time of it. Two of the dances have more in common than one-word titles. Although separated by more than 60 years, each is set to music by William Walton, whose centenary is being observed this year
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<small>[ 30 November 2003, 01:53 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: BRB "Tombeaux" Mixed Bill 2002
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2002 1:07 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 2172
Location: London
<B>BRB triple bill <BR>3 stars (out of 5)<BR>Birmingham Hippodrome</B><P>Judith Mackrell<BR>Guardian<P>Friday March 15, 2002<P><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Birmingham Royal Ballet has dedicated its latest triple bill to this year's Walton centenary celebrations, and the main feature of the programme is Façade, the score that enrolled Walton into London's circle of eccentric, upper-class modernists. <P>Walton's fantastical setting of Edith Sitwell's poetry inspired Frederick Ashton to create his own gleefully parodic ballet in 1931. Its cast of deadpan, dapper Eton boaters, debutantes and ever-so-slightly soiled tango-dancers is now a much cherished route back to the dance fashions of its era, as well as to the early days of British ballet. <P>The ballet's mix of sophistication and naivety is, however, a hard one for dancers today. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P> <BR><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4374576,00.html" TARGET=_blank><B>more...</B></A><P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 15, 2002).]


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