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 Post subject: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2003 3:35 pm 
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Laurie Booth

WHAT: ICE/DREAMS/FIRE

WHEN: TUE 28 – THU 30 OCT

WHERE: GREENWICH DANCE AGENCY

TICKETS: 020 8293 9741

‘He can invest the simplest things
with greatness, a dancer at his creative
and physical peak’

Sunday Telegraph

click here for details


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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2003 4:51 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 119
Location: London/Chicago
For the past 10 years Bessie awards are given to outstanding work done by artists in dance and performance art that beigns the new fall season of dance in New York. The Bessies, named after the dance teacher Bessie Schönberg, are the dance equivalent of the Tonys and Oscars. The prized acknowledgment is given from a community of peers who say an artist’s work is valued, respected and attributed a special significance in the American legacy of dance. The cash prize of $500 and $1,000 that accompanies the award is not much and not the point as much as the recognition that comes along with them. This recognition can be used to gain assess to other more lucrative ventures much needed for any working dance artists. A 22-member panel of dance performers, producers and writers chooses the winners. If Laurie Booth lived in New York, I think he would have received this award if not for his extraordinary work but because he holds a profound place in the pantheon of contemporary dance makers. Well Laurie lives in Britain and what he’s been is marginalized and forced out of dance for about 3 years. What does this say about the dance community of Britain??

<small>[ 05 October 2003, 06:51 AM: Message edited by: THEA NERISSA BARNES ]</small>

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2003 1:11 pm 
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Location: London, England
I interviewed Laurie Booth recently and he wasn't very complimentary about the arts establishment in the UK. Mainly the funding process.

I also saw Ice/Dreams/Fire which premiered in this year's Brighton Festival. Laurie is in amazing shape, he's been doing loads of gyrotonic work and he's a commanding performer but the work left me a little adrift. Then again, that's the risk with improvisation, sometimes everything clicks into place, sometimes it doesn't. A very interesting guy though.


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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2003 3:21 am 
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Posts: 294
Location: Italy and UK
The picture displayed in the Dance Umbrella booklet is very evocative. I do hope I will be able to see his work on Tuesday. I did not know Booth had been training in gyrotonic. For those of you who are interested in this discipline, here is a very interesting centre based in Rome.

http://www.gyrotonic-roma.com/home_en.htm

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2003 1:34 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Review from The Telegraph.

Quote:
Booth, now 49, appears rarely these days, but his legendary uncategorisability is probably enhanced by age. Ice/Dreams/Fire is a new solo in a multi-art collaboration, and breathtakingly atmospheric. Thomas Richards's hanging sculpture of frozen red rags looks like frozen flames, but gradually melts through the evening, dripping into metal pails wired to Nick Rothwell's impressive sound desk which turns their random splats into marvellous echoey syncopations.

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2003 1:53 am 
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Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Review from The Guardian.

Quote:
In 1947, archaeologists discovered a burial ground that had been frozen deep in the Serbian permafrost for 6,000 years. The skins of the corpses were covered in vibrant tattoos, whose animal shapes and patterns spoke of ancient, powerful magic. Ice/Dreams/Fire is Laurie Booth's attempt to re-create that magic.
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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2003 4:07 pm 
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Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia

Laurie Booth

By Jann Parry for The Observer

Laurie Booth, once a Dance Umbrella regular, returned after an eight-year absence in the guise of a shaman. Ice, Dreams, Fire evokes an ancient European past, brought into the present through the witchcraft of modern technology. Fascinated by the discovery of 6,000-year-old tattooed bodies preserved in the permafrost of the Siberian steppes, Booth conjures up his vision of their spirit world.

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2003 5:30 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Laurie Booth
By Jenny Gilbert for The Independent

Not so the sensational Ice/ Dreams/ Fire which showed as a separate Umbrella event a few nights later, using contact technology to much more potent effect. Thomas Richards' hanging sculpture of frozen red shirts - inspired by the discovery of a 6,000-year-old corpse in Siberian permafrost - thaws over the course of the evening...

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2003 4:37 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Ice/Dreams/ Fire, Greenwich Dance Agency
By Zoe Anderson for The Independent

Ice/Dreams/Fire was inspired by mummies found in a 6,000-year-old burial site. The bodies, preserved in Siberian perma-frost, were discovered in 1947. They were covered in the earliest-known tattoos; strange pictures of hybrid animals. Laurie Booth is fascinated by these images, the deliberate marking of the body, and the ice.

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 Post subject: Re: Laurie Booth
PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2003 6:42 am 
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Laurie Booth has stated, "What we suffer from in this country is a lack of analysis as to how things happen aesthetically speaking. " This seems a challenge to allow his work to describe its significance from its own perspective. This is a challenge to observe and describe an event; to witness the performance and if possible fathom how the work is made. Most importantly it is a challenge to abandon familiar ideas of what is and how dance occurs.

To explore aesthetic preferences in Booth and Mantsoe is to explore the logic behind dance making. One analyses the balance between form and content, analyses the chosen movement vocabulary, then examines the use of mime, metaphor and metonym. With Booth and Mantsoe the manipulation of the performative act itself is at the crux of their work; how the performer negotiates the terrain between himself that is the art and the audience who witnesses his negotiation. Thinking archaeology is another strategy learned from Booth whose excavations in the more seminal of human kinetic sensation runs parallel to Mantsoe’s excavations that merge his faith and spirituality with concert dance performance. Also, being solo performers makes the art readily available because there is no intermediary to diffuse intentions.

At Vincent Mantsoe’s performance 26 October 2003 at The Place: Robin Howard Dance Theatre, there was a heighten level of ritual. There was a sense that the audience was witnessing a spiritual event. BUPIRO-MUKITI dance of life (2002) finds its inspiration in an African legend from the Bantu-speaking peoples. Mantsoe’s invests his embodied knowledge of movement vocabularies from Africa, Asia, and Europe with his spirituality. It is this that serves as a starting point for Mantsoe to expound on tradition through movement. Sitting on his heels, Mantsoe beats a small drum and each beat expels white dust. The dance moves from sitting to standing and then a bird like walk that has its own level of sacredness. The music created the sound scape for Mantsoe’s movement to serge through.

Mantsoe second work, NADD (World Premiere) asks a question, “Is there anyone here, is there something existing around me that I can not see or hear. Am I existing between reality and imagination. Do you see me?” Mantsoe strokes the bottom of his foot as he takes a momentary glance to the audience. Was this gesture addressing the audience; his eyes seem to indicate so. There are seven bamboo reeds placed in the space in a particular way creating a surrounded area that Mantsoe weaves in and out of. The bamboo reeds serve as boundaries that restrict his travels but enable the space to be traversed in a limited but determined manner. Most memorable of the music was the banter of Gabon Bibayak Pygmies. These conversations created a familiar ambiance of people gathered sharing pleasantries, passing the time of day. When people meet, what is shared in the glance of an eye, a touch of hand or tilt of head? Do we recognise only what we see or what other dimensions of them have we considered, have we missed. In the gathering, who else stands amongst us, behind us and is there the possibility to touch a spiritual entity? Mantose says, We breath a flesh we cannot see… Is our exhalation the enlivenment of spiritual entities? Mantsoe’s expiration is a means to share a bit of him self with an audience member making the blowing of his breath an offering of his spirit. For Mantsoe, without the energy to receive and give back what is the point.

It is not enough to write Mantsoe “takes you on a journey”. Can the written text really describe the landscape he traverses? Can it name the clusters of experiences that signpost the spiritual ness of his art? The tension and dynamic escalates from stillness to jubilance or is it exaltation or some form of fanatical ecstasy. This experiential journey seeks a liminal response; the performative act more than possession or sensual ness, more than the translation of dance movement into embodied expertise. Here too is archaeology of the dancing person. Contemporary and Afro-fusion are the vocabularies South African Vincent Mantsoe has trained in. He bases his work on ritual and spirits and is influenced by South African cultures, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, and Balinese. Mantsoe has desired to dance since he was born and is the progeny of a Zulu sangoma. Having a workable knowledge of dance styles from several cultures, Mantsoe borrows, merges only that sense of movements he understands or touches him in a special way. Mantsoe uses nuances from varied sources to combine or compliment different movement expressions. It could be a movement idea, a dynamic, or a particular movement quality that he will then re-shape to make his own personal expression. This same manner of choice is used for the music that supports the environment or provides the rhythms for his dances. Mantsoe does not use improvisation; his dances being the result of hours of research and practice. Mantsoe intends to choreograph a journey of self-healing that offers, indeed invites audience members to travel spiritually also. Mantsoe believes ...the spirit of each and every individual person... is not different... but at the end of the day we all have a common goal... which is healing and peace. Mantsoe is drenched in content. Form in this aesthetic is the vehicle through which content speaks.

Mantsoe invests his movement with meanings that go beyond the common ness or what is thought to be the “tradition” of African dance. Mantsoe seeks a communion with audience members so that they can join him on his plane where ancestral knowing leads to intercultural sharing and recognition. This is a revisionist device to transcend staid, shortsighted ness that curtails the transcendence of cultural encounters. This is Mantsoe’s way of cultivating the possibilities inherent in the meeting of varied experiences or varied life views. In his performance and especially in the work, NADD, Mantsoe has reverent joy, dedication, and passion that are evidenced in the meticulousness with which he shapes his movement. This is done not just to convey significance but also to serve as a conduit between him, audience members and the spirituality he believes resides within and around all of us.

There are similarities and dissimilarities a plenty between these artists and their chosen aesthetics. Recently and given the recognition Booth has received in the 25th anniversary season of dance umbrella, we have possibly arrived at a point in time when Laurie Booth’s art may be considered mainstream, or at least no longer “cutting edge”. Vincent Mantsoe is in the beginning of his international notoriety yet his genre has multiple traditions and preconceived notions that mitigate against and misconstrue the place of his work. In the end the aesthetic of each speaks to it’s being.

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