public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Thu Oct 02, 2014 12:48 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 1999 10:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
In an end of the decade article, (link given below) Ismene Brown, the dance critic of London's 'Daily Telegraph', reviews dance in the UK in the 90's. <P>Her main thesis is that, since the death of Kenneth Macmillan (always more highly regarded here in the UK than in the US), the dynamic part of the UK scene has been the modern dance sector. It's an argument I would find it hard to argue with and, although my knowledge base is weak, I suspect that it is true for the US as well.<P>In Continental Europe, the situation is rather more balanced with Forsythe, Ek, von Manen and sometimes Bejart still coming up with the goods in ballet choreography.<P>Have I got it wrong for the US or elsewhere?<BR> <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/et?ac=000148269364269&rtmo=3wuqYurM&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/99/12/25/banine04.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.telegraph.co.uk/et?ac=000148269364269&rtmo=3wuqYurM&atmo= 99999999&pg=/et/99/12/25/banine04.html</A> <p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited 03-28-2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 1999 2:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Stuart, you left out Uwe Scholz of Leipzig whom some are saying is the new Crown Prince in Classical Ballet.<P>I think ballet is alive and well in the US. Due to the open-ended nature of modern dance, I thought modern dance was more dynamic than ballet but, when compared to Europe, modern dance here seems a little stale to me. And at the same time, I have seen some exciting ballet works coming from SFB's Val Caniparoli and Christopher Stowell, NYCB's Christopher Wheeldon, and Diablo Ballet's Nikolai Kabanaiev among others.<P>Hmm, maybe we can get trina to add her comments.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2000 2:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
Happy New Year! I've been out of cyberland for a couple of weeks-vacationing in NO. California,enjoying life.<BR>Interesting topic. My mentor at Juilliard Dance Dept, Martha Hill, told us students way back in l981 that eventually boundaries between "styles" of dance would become loosened..I think it's definetly happening already. Dancers in the major companies are expected to have rock solid ballet technique , but yet be able to do modern choreography. Of course, the "classics" will always be with us.., but audiences, critics, dancers want the "best of all worlds", different points of view, different perspectives and movement vocabularies. Some choreographers that I like who bridge these boundaries between modern/classical ballet: Jiri Kylian (my all time fave), Pina Bausch , Nacho Duato, Mats Ek (I liked his Carmen quite a bit on video), ; oddly, I can't think of many in the US. I've seen Hans van Manen, and for some odd reason, I always come away disappointed...? IN this country, I do love Susan Marshall, but her early stuff---havent' seen much of her recent stuff. More later!!


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2000 7:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Trina, Europe seems to be at the forefront of many things. How do you suppose we can get some of that innovation happening here in the US?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2000 8:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
Azlan, in answer to your question, I refer you to two things: 1. When I saw Pina Bausch's company perform in l988, I was amazed by the fact that she seemed to have unlimited budget for costumes, sets, etc. Ever time I turned around, the women were changing into a different ball gown, or some such expensive item. The piece i saw "Nelken" (Carnations) has the complete stage floor covered with fresh carnations (at least when I saw it) Not that money is going to create a masterpiece, but isn't it intersting that the arts budgets in Europe are much higher than here, and almost all the people on my list were European (I didn't even realize that unitl you pointed it out!) 2. Find the most recent issue of "Contact Quarterly" magazine. (Don't know if you are familiar with this publication; it is a magazine that is concerned with the improvisational dance community; you can get it at any alternative, artsy, new-age type bookstore/newstand)Anyway, there is an excellent article in there which is actually an e-mail transcript (over several months) between 2 friends who are professional dancers. One in Europe, one in US. Concerning your question of the financial/spiritual/cultural roles and conflicts of dance in American vs. Europe. VEry revealing and explores this question much better than anything I've read as of late.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2001 12:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
This was a discussion we had in the early days of criticaldance when there weren't too many people around. It seemed to me that it was well worth another look.<P>In the 15 months since its first outing, here in the UK we have had some interesting new work in ballet, but the most well received new work by the Royal Ballet was by the modern dance trained Wayne McGregor. No sign of a talent of the order of Ashton or MacMillan emerging or perhaps Cranko. If anything the wonderful trip down Memory Lane of Anthony Dowell's final season has reminded us of the riches from the past. <P>Although a number of the leading UK modern choreographers have been resting or working overseas, it remains my impression that this is the main area of vitality for new work in dance. <P>Continental Europe sems to be doing better. We have just seen Dutch National Ballet which established for many that Hans van Manen's explorations of relationships using largely classical technique make him one of the best of the current choreographers. Forsythe and Ballett Frankfurt continue to set the pace in the ballet world and their return visit to London this Autumn will be very exciting.<P>When I look to the US, the names of the outstanding choreographers currently working that come to my mind are Morris, Taylor, Tharp etc. I wonder how many choreographers who came from the ballet world initially would appear in the top ten of most people's lists. I think there would be few on the UK list either.<P>What do others think?<P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 30, 2001).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2001 11:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
I have been impressed with Christopher Wheeldon and Julie Adam, but these a choreographers that actively seek out modern vocabulary. In modern dance in this country I haven't seen too many brilliant newcommers show themselves like Morris and Bill T. Jones did in the '80's. But, the millenium is still new...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2001 8:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
In the United States, modern choreographers/ies who have recently caught my attention and I think are really "pushing the edge of the envelope" are: Ron Brown, Bill T., Momix (especially that yoga-y duet, I think it was called "TU") and the only ballet choreographer's who's work I've seen lately and said "wow" was Val Caliponari (oh gosh, did I spell his name right?). I saw Lambarena and am REALLY looking forward to his premiere this weekend at PNB.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Modern Dance Rules, OK!
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2001 9:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
Me again. Just rememebered Twyla. My all time fave. (one of) But, dont' know what she's up to these days. One minute she has a new school and company , the next minute she doesnt'. But someone who's choreographed a piece like "Deuce Coupe" and "Push Comes to Shove" can rest on her laurels a bit, you know?<BR>I just don't know if we'll see the convergence of factors (societal, financial, pure genius) that produced a Balanchine or Robbins anytime soon. I almost think that a genius needs to have adversity, to "push through" as Hanya Holm used to say. Maybe flush economic times don't always lead to great genius. That sounds hopelessly old-fashioned, but hmmm. I have to think about that for a while


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group