public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Thu Oct 23, 2014 11:21 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 104 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2002 10:02 am 
I meant to start this thread a while ago,but when or what is considered 'too old' to dance(for a dancer)? This is a carry over from threads 'when should a dancer stop' and from the Karen Kain thread.
When she/he gets wrinkles? When flesh is not AS firm as a 19 year olds? Or is it simply when he or she loses certain abilities :confused:
I know we all have strong opinions about this.

<small>[ 10-16-2002, 14:09: Message edited by: angela ]</small>


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2002 12:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Angela, is this a very similar discussion to the current topic "When should a dancer stop!!"?

<small>[ 10-16-2002, 14:20: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2002 12:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Riverside, CA
There is no reason for a dancer to stop dancing simply because they are no longer "young" sheesh! If you really like to dance, keep doing it. Don't stop cause some prude says you look too "old" to be on stage. BAWH
(if you are breaking your body just to dancing you may want to consider at least a rest from it) :cool:


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2002 1:00 pm 
I like your attitude junkoplenty.
Yes Stuart,this is similiar--I just specifically put in the word 'old'. I dont know how to connect the threads-if anyone does be my guest or add your opinions to this one please.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2002 11:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 185
Location: France
I suppose there is not one and a single answer for this question. Because a "too something" supposes a "for something" or a "to something". So, when is a dancer too old... for what ?

Too old to enjoy dancing - that is, movement and expression ? never, I suppose.

Too old to dance flamenco ? to dance ballet ? to dance irish dances ? Again, it depends.

Too old to dance as a teacher ? to demonstrate ? see thread in the "studio" forum :)

<small>[ 10-17-2002, 13:39: Message edited by: AlinWond ]</small>


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2002 11:41 am 
To be specific AlinWond,to old to perform or rather STAY in a dance company particularly a ballet or modern company.
It seems like some feel that once your getting close to 40,you should quit no matter how much dance prowess(sp)or ability is still with you.

<small>[ 10-17-2002, 13:42: Message edited by: angela ]</small>


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 1:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 1
Location: California
I'm waiting to be "too old". I'm 38 and me and my 7 year old daughter just auditioned for the nutcracker and both got parts! I am dancing with people young enough to be my kids and am in better shape then most of them. It depends on how well you keep in shape. Sometimes you have to do more than dance to keep a firm body. It was akward dancing with people so much younger than me - but if you still "got it" - go for it. I feel so lucky to be able to do this still.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 1:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 602
Location: Seattle, WA,USA
Ok I am going to be bold ( and likely destroyed :) ), but i think the transition should occur from about 35-40. I think it is necessary to give the younger dancers a chance to develop, I think that it generally makes the company more financially viable, and unfortunately there is that percived correlation between youth and beauty ( this is not necessarily my perception, but I think it is generally dominant in todays society ).
I believe this transition should be well planned for by the company up front, particularily financially, but also emotionally. There may be obvious exceptions, but I think this is the actual reality ( perhaps even shifted upwards a few years ).


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 1:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
It also depends on the professional quality of the company, don't you think? When I mean professional, I'm not of course referring to pick-up gigs (getting paid for a gig, like getting a stipend for jury duty) but companies whose dancers depend on this art form for their livelihood and who rehearse and perform 30+ hours a week.

With the degree of quality expected of highly professional companies, the age at which a dancer can perform for that company will be lower than the age for a dancer performing pick-up gigs for a community company. So wouldn't it vary depending on circumstance, very important factors being the expected quality of the dancing and the credibility of the company?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 2:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 602
Location: Seattle, WA,USA
Absolutely. I am thinking about ABT/SFB/PNWB.... Even these dancers however, generally are not payed enough to tuck away for their future after dance, which REALLY bothers me and where I hope to put most of my personal energy.
Also, I have a sense that retired professional dancers have a lot to offer in other areas as well. That level of discipline and passion can hopefully be channelled to other areas of our community which really are in desperate need of it. And I am not strictly referring to the arts, but to other areas such as politics, teaching,....
I think that we owe it to these 'older' dancers to make their transition as painless as possible. Wee also owe it to ourselves not to lose these very exceptional individuals.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 3:34 pm 
Matthew--WE KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE :mad: :mad: :mad: !
(LOLOLOLOL).
You made a good point-but I lean toward junkoplenty and Loretta's opinions.And I guess I feel that younger dancers have time for both parts/positions as well as development(even greater depth in their dancing as they mature).
LORETTA-you go woman!I'm excited for you;Tell us what part your playing and how it goes for you.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 5:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
I have seen dancers on stage who are "older" and some have been successful and others have not. The biggest distinction was if they looked like they were in pain. If your body is so broken down by the art form that you can no longer perform without a great deal of pain (enough pain that it is visible to the audience) then you should not be onstage. If the audience is worried that you are going to break in half the next time you are lifted because you look so frail, then it is time to retire from performing.

However, a dancer is never too old to coach or teach or mentor or support the dancer world (or the regular world).


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 9:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 293
Location: USA
A dancer is too old when they loooose their attitude! ;)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2002 4:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 10
Location: UK
Men and women are never too old to dance: either professionally or just for pleasure. Whether they can find employment as a dancer when they are over 40 is another matter; this depends on the attitude and needs of any employer (company/production/choreographer).

To say a dancer should give up because they are over 35 or 40 is, with all due respect, an ageist attitude. Would anyone say, a writer should give up writing at 40? A musician stop playing at 50?

Dancing is physically demanding but there can be power and beauty in watching an older person perform. It is just a different sort and style of performance from someone younger. Quite a few years ago, I remember reading a review of Lynn Seymour, returning to dance in something in London, (unfortunately, I canot remember the production) but the words of the reviewer, Judith Mackrell, I more or less do: she said words to the effect that "the collective heads of English ballet should hang their heads in shame for neglecting such a magnificent artist for so long". She was neglected because she was seen as past it! Totally untrue.

It is great for Loretta that she has a part, and at 38, I hope she has many more ahead of her. The Japanese have a word, I believe: Shibui (the beauty of aging). An interesting word to contemplate, I think.

Young dancers can jump higher. And should. But let's not push older performers out because they no longer "look" (and this is what it is really about) young.

By the way, where are these productions with people crippled with pain on the stage? Are there medical teams with stretchers in the wings? Sorry. No offence. I had to say it.

<small>[ 10-23-2002, 13:14: Message edited by: Simon R B ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: When IS a dancer 'too old?'
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2002 4:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 102
Location: Cardiff, Wales, UK
Loretta, thank you so much for inspiration! I'm 30 years old and started ballet last year (when I was 29). I passed my Chechetti Grade 4 in the Summer and am now starting a bit of pointe work, studying for Grade 5, along with dancing the role of the Prince in my Ballet School's (all-female!) production of Cinderella this year.

I really hope that in about 8 years or so I will be doing the same as you!!!


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 104 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group