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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2003 12:52 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Wind in the Willows
By Allen Robertson for The Times


THE star of this show is a snowstorm that descends on the audience just before the interval. It is a moment of sheer magic and, judging from the gleeful reactions of all ages, a treat to equal the real thing.
William Tuckett’s playful production of The Wind in the Willows, playing until January 3, is based on incidents from Kenneth Grahame’s children’s classic. It begins and ends in a dusty attic with an avuncular narrator and his long-ago memories.

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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2003 12:53 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
The Bolshoi as never seen before
The troubled Bolshoi Ballet has turned to theatre director Declan Donnellan for fresh ideas. Rupert Christiansen for The Daily Telegraph reports from Moscow.


The turmoil at the Bolshoi Theatre continues. Ever since perestroika, this lodestar of Soviet culture has lurched from crisis to crisis, buffeted by management purges, budget cuts, defecting dancers and disastrous foreign tours - not least its last visit to London in 2001 and a tragi-comic fiasco in Las Vegas.

In the course of its search for a fresh identity, the Bolshoi's management contacted Declan Donnellan, founder-director of the revolutionary small-scale touring group Cheek by Jowl. Donnellan's work is very popular in Russia.

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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2003 11:32 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
“The Wind in the Willows”, Linbury Studio Theatre, 23 December, 2003

“The Wind in the Willows” is a fine piece of dance theatre for children, which can also be enjoyed by adults without embarrassment. The multi-purpose set designed by the Quay Brothers is delightful – a large cupboard disgorges a fabric river and is transformed into a horse-drawn caravan in one scene and a forest hiding place in another. A giant rocking chair becomes a prison cell and Ratty first appears rowing a small boat round his waist.

Best of all is the fine ensemble playing with Matthew Hart, as the hyper-kinetic Toad, producing giggles whenever he appears. Will Kemp as Ratty finds a level of detail and subtlety, an arched eyebrow here, a dramatic pose there, that marks him out as an exceptional performer. His experience with Matthew Bourne’s productions has provided him with an excellent platform for this role. Kenneth Tharp, Iohna Loots, Joh Williams, Luke Heydon and Tom Sapsford complete the cast of some of the best character dancers in the country and Director William Tucketts’s choreography fits the action and the narrative without distracting from the action.

The everyday dress of the characters emphasises their humanity and the weasels as Teddy Boys works neatly as a device. At 75 minutes the work is succinct and should keep the attention of even the youngest. The end of the interval is cleverly announced with Toad rushing through the foyer with his car round his waist and policemen at his heels.

Not all the elements hit the mark - Andrew Motion’s text is too complex for children and too dull for adults and although Martin Ward's incidental music of folk themes is charming, his songs do not register. Nevertheless, overall “The Wind in the Willows” is a treat and the finale of Act I, when snow falls on-stage and then in the auditorium, produced squeals of delight. Best of all, the work introduces a future generation of dance-goers to high quality design and story-telling through movement, with vitality and flair.

<small>[ 06 January 2004, 02:23 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2003 12:57 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
The Wind in the Willows Royal Opera House, London
By David Jays for The Financial Times


Kenneth Grahame's story, written for his son in 1908, is an Edwardian fantasia with added whiskers. His riverbank characters mess about in boats and snuffle through the larder - it's a seductive world of gentle leisure.

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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2003 2:58 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Wind in the Willows
By David Dougill for The Sunday Times

William Tuckett’s delightful adaptation of The Wind in the Willows is back down below, in the Linbury Studio Theatre, for its second season. This is a treat for all ages, though small children might not keep up with the poet laureate Andrew Motion’s verse narrative.

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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2004 3:05 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
The Wind in the Willows
Linbury Studio, Royal Opera House, London
By John Percival for The Stage

What most pleased my two pre-teen consultants on Wind in the Willows were the characters and I think they are right. The commentary by poet laureate Andrew Motion did not impress them, although it is mostly well put over by David Burke.

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 Post subject: Re: "The Wind in the Willows" by William Tuckett
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2004 4:29 am 
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Location: France
I took my mother to see 'The wind in the willows' on the evening of 23rd Dec, i originally phoned for tickets to see Cinderella but alas i'd left it too late. The man on the other end of the phone did a great job of convincing me to see the wind in the willows as so there we were down in the dark depths on the Lindbury studio Theatre! We certainly were not dissapointed in fact it was so beautiful during the first 20mins we both had tears in our eyes (a right emotional pair we both are).
I'm not a great critique so i won't bore you all with details of why i loved it so much but i have to say we both felt that the intimacy of the theatre was wonderful especially being able to see the small orchestra and our favourite part was the carol singers came out and it started to snow inside the theatre (Totally magical at that time of year).
I would thoroughly recommend it!!

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