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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2002 4:23 am 
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Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
I thought this was interesting - and to me disturbing...but not surprising....

From the Chicago Sun Times:

Author! Author?

August 14, 2002

BY MIKE THOMAS STAFF REPORTER

Quote:
Tom Clancy, one of the world's most celebrated fiction writers, lands in Chicago on Wednesday to promote his latest effort, Red Rabbit, which he wrote all by himself.

Well, of course he wrote it all by himself. Who else would write a Tom Clancy novel but Tom Clancy? As it turns out, a stable of folks. Like a growing number of perpetual best sellers, Clancy acts as a sort of producer for some of his books, though not the Jack Ryan ones that made him famous. The themes and story lines are his, but the prose is merely an approximation.
MORE...

A dancer could never get away with this...

<small>[ 08-14-2002, 07:24: Message edited by: Basheva ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2002 7:51 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
With this method, Balanchine could still be choreographing.


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 4:20 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
With this method I could be another Fonteyn.... :)


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 2:26 pm 
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Location: Canada
Jeff, I was just wondering if you read anything by Jeanette Winterson in your classes... classic angry-ish female writer. "Written On The Body" will make you laugh and cry and wonder if you're reading about a man or a woman, and that's all I'm going to say about it.

If anyone wants a really entertaining eye-opener, read "Poisonwood Bible" by Barbara Kingslover. I even recommended it to my mother, and she hasn't put it down for days. It's about an American family who takes a missions trip to the Congo and it's brilliantly written. A few tiny historical flaws but you'd never notice and since it's fiction maybe it's okay.

_________________
~Sarah~<P>


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 3:02 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
That's "Kingsolver."


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 8:07 pm 
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Posts: 457
Location: Jamaica, Queens, New York
Sarah, we didn’t read any Jeanette Winterson in either of my summer W/S classes—the lit one or the media one. But, that might have been because summer classes always have a really truncated reading list. I wish I could have taken both classes during the regular semester in order to be able to go more in depth.

From the media class, here’s a quick overview, mostly excepts:
</font>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Liz Kelly. Surviving Sexual Violence. U </font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Minn P, 1998.</font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Susan Faludi. “The Wages of Backlash: The Toll on Working Women.” Backlash the Undeclared War Against American Women. Anchor, 1992.</font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Mariana Valverde. Sex, Power, and Pleasure. South End P, 1987.
    [These 3 were about how women are subjected to various kinds of oppression by society—either sexual, occupational, economic.]
    </font></li>
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial"></font>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Priscilla Walton and Mania Jones. Detective Agency: Women Rewriting the Hard-Boiled Tradition. U Berkeley, 1999. [About female detective genre.]</font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Harold Jenkins. Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture. Routledge, 1992. [Primer on “fan fic.”]
    </font></li>
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial"></font>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Episodes of “American Family” on PBS</font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Movies, Silence of the Lambs by Jonathan Demme, 1991, and Fire by Deepa Mehta, 1998.</font></li>
  • <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">One for the Money by Janet Evanovich. [This is what started this thread]
    A romance novel of our choice (I won’t tell you what I read because I wouldn’t recommend it—not sexy enough).
    </font></li>
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Since I’m in a UBB list mood, here's what I jotted down from this thread to take w/ me on my next tript to Borders or Acres of Books:
</font></li></font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Edison Marshall—The Lost Colony.</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Alvin Yudkoff—Gene Kelly: A Life of Dances and Dreams</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Mary Margaret Kaye—The Far Pavilions (I’ll probably “do” this one on audio book)</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">William Bradford—The Bradford History (not Bradstreet)</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Naguib Mahfouz—browse</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Hasdai Ibn Shaprut—ask at the information desk</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Don Marquis and George Herriman—The Lives and Times of Archy and Mehitabel</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Sharon Wyse—The Box Children</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Jeanette Winterston—Written on the Body</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Barbara Kingsolver—Poisonwood Bible</font></li>[*]<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">The Merce Cunningham book—Other Animals: Drawings and Journals
From my W/S class, I have “Anita Blake” books by Laurel K. Hamilton
I’m sorry if I didn’t jot everybody’s suggestions down for me to look into, but I only have 2 weeks before fall term.

<small>[ 08-15-2002, 22:41: Message edited by: Jeff ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2002 4:53 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Jeff, I need to warn you, there's a problem with reading those old English books like The Bradford History - it ruins your (well, at least it did mine) spelling.

Has anyone enjoyed Theodore Dreiser as much as I have? "American Tragedy" or "Sister Carrie" are quite marvelous, I think.

<small>[ 08-16-2002, 07:15: Message edited by: Basheva ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2002 9:02 pm 
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Location: Jamaica, Queens, New York
FYI …

Its not exactly along the lines of the topic of this thread, but since things my prof has mentioned has come up once or twice, I thought that I would post a link to the professor of my W/S media class’s website. She’s quite the expert on internet culture and her website is pretty interesting.

Main Page

In addition to stuff that would only be of interest to her students like her office hours and “Study Questions” for assignments such as One for the Money (“How would you compare Stephanie Plum to Clarice Starling? Which text—Silence of the Lambs or One for the Money—was easier for you to watch or read? Why?”) there is a link to feminism related quotes, including this definition of feminism:

“A feminist is a person who answers "yes" to the question, "Are women human?" Katha Pollitt

Fem Quotes

Here’s a link to feminism and media related resources from her site.

Resources


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2002 10:19 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
Jeff, thanks for the "Fem Quotes" link. It's interesting that the sentiment expressed in the following quote has been around for such a long time:

Quote:
"I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is: I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat."

-Rebecca West, British writer, speaking in 1913


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2002 7:29 am 
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Posts: 4753
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
I'm looking forward to getting my copy of <u>The Nanny Diaries</u> to fulfil my quota of light summer reading. Last summer David Sedaris' <u>Me Talk Pretty One Day</u> was my pick for lit-lite (although I'm not as linguistically challenged in French as Sedaris, I'm not as handi-capable as I am in English).

On a more serious note, I'm re-reading Michel Tremblay's chronicles of the Plateau Mont-Royal (he is also a playwright, Hosanna is probably one of his best known in English), this time in French - the English translations are excellent though, I highly recommend them to anyone who has enjoyed books like The Shipping News. The series of six novels covers the life of a Montreal working class family in the 1940s.


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2002 10:19 pm 
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Location: Jamaica, Queens, New York
OK, confession time…

I went by Border’s fully intending to leave with something by a Nobel laureate or at least a book that people won’t sniff at … but I left with Guilty Pleasures, the first in Laurell K. Hamilton’s series of SF/detective novels about Anita Blake, professional zombie raiser (“animator”) and sometime vampire destroyer.

It’s the setting that catches your attention—St. Louis in a long, hot summer of trouble. But, it’s not any St. Louis we’ve ever been in. In Anita Blake’s world, magic, were-animals, and zombies are a fact and vampires run nightclubs, perform in strip clubs, and even have their own church, “The Church of Eternal Life.”

Vampires are also the victims of a serial killer—which is why the underworld leaders of the vampire community force an unwilling Anita, professional animator and sometime vampire killer dubbed by the vampiric community as “The Exectioner” to help them.

I can see why the prof put this in the regular semester version of the women & media class as an example of the hard boiled female detective genre. There is a definite acknowledgement of the masculine counterpart. Like many hard boiled detectives, such as the Hammet’s Op and Chandler’s Marlowe, Blake is a liminal figure working on the fringes of legitimacy—she is human but can raise the dead (“I raise the dead for a living, no pun intended”); her friends are policemen but she allies with were-rats and shyster versions of the un-dead. She’s also one tough cookie with her arsenal of crosses, silver knives hidden on various parts of her body, and firearms. Its not for nothing that she is dubbed, “The Executioner.”

But, Blake is also not like male hard boiled detectives. For one thing, she doesn’t drink and though the novel has sexual themes, to borrow an e-zine reviewer’s phrase, they’re sort of PG-13—mainly fairly standard vampire-eros-thanatos type stuff. Like male detectives, Blake has many scars but she worries about how to hide them (and also the arsenal that seems to be apropos to the vampire destroying profession—a particular challenge when it comes to slinky nightclub outfits). But, at heart, she’s really a softie and tears appear in a way that I don’t remember happening in a Ross MacDonald or Philip Kerr story.

Here’s more about Guilty Pleasures including some interesting book covers

From “Women Writers: A Zine” comes a pretty readable review including an interview:

Womenwriters.net on Laurell. K. Hamilton

[BTW, for grad students out there, Womenswriters.net has an amusing “Grad Student Barbie” about 3/4s the way down the page on the discussion about Barbie]

Barbie


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2002 11:18 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
"Grad Student Barbie" -- very funny. One of my coworkers kept a "Trailer Trash Barbie" at her desk for awhile, when our firm was involved in a copyright infringement case (or freedom of expression, in the defendant's view) involving the use of Barbie dolls.


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 11:58 am 
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Posts: 255
I tend to buy books in bunches, read them all, then order a new bunch. My latest bunch of books, one even dance related, all either just arrived or (hopefully) en route:
Autobiography, Margot Fonteyn [dance]
The Character of Cats [biology]
Champions [baseball]
Sexual Selection [more biology]
Class Action [politics/women's rights]
And 3 videos, 2 Swan Lakes and Ballanchine's Four Temperaments.
It's not light reading, but anyone else here read either The Physics of Dance or Physics, Dance and the Pas de Deux? I liked both.


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 12:39 pm 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Yes, I have read Margot Fonteyn's autobiography. And I have a copy and have read and enjoyed Kenneth Laws' "The Physics of Dance" and Anton Dolin's "Pas de Deux."


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 Post subject: Re: Light Summer Reading
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 12:47 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
I haven't read either of the physics/dance books. I knew some teachers who should have read them, though. It was always so frustrating to be asked to do something that is physically impossible. I didn't mind when the teacher said it was just someting to visualize, but a couple of them insisted that the requested feat was actually possible.

I enjoyed Fonteyn's autobiography. Her style was self-effacing and quite humorous.


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