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 Post subject: Split jumps (Grand jete?)
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2001 2:20 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 54
Location: uk
Could anyone explain sort of step by step how a front split jump is achieved? (from beginning position to end position). When I manage to nearly get a split in the air (by the way does this require strength??) I tend to land very ungracefully, loudly and as for being turned out I really cannot tell.<P>I would be grateful for any advice that anyone could offer and whether this is a particulary difficult movement (I can do 'beyond' splits with the front leg elevated but only when very warmed up). Thanks everyone

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 Post subject: Re: Split jumps (Grand jete?)
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2001 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
In my opinion, the grand jeté is a true test of the balance between stretch and strength. Being able to get a high extension or a split - is no guarantee of a split grand jeté. In the air the dancer no longer has the advantage of holding onto a barre - nor bracing against the floor to help with a split.<P>One of the best ways I know of to increase strength to accomplish the grand jeté, is with grand battement. When you kick the leg out - never let it drop. Always lower it from the grand battement with control. Feel that control. Allowing the leg to drop back down after the grand battement gains you nothing.<P>A couple more things....while you are in the air - and you have to learn this timing carefully - go for the "second" split - a breath - an inhale and split further in the air. Nijinski recommended this and he was certainly famous for his jumps.<P>As for getting into the grand jeté, there are a number of ways to do this. Stand in fifth position, right foot front, croisé (to go down the diagonal} and then temps levé (jump up in fifth position and land with front foot in coupé}, slide out to pas de bourrée (left foot doing back, side, front}, glissade with right foot, and then battement the right foot into the grand jeté. <P>Remember not to throw that grand battement too high in the front or it will be like trying to jump over a horse and you won't be able to get the back leg up to clear the horse. The object is to get both legs open equally. <P>The grand jeté has two qualities - a split quality but also a height quality. Most of us more readily achieve one more than the other. I always got the height part better because I am stronger than stretchy. Most women, however, tend to get the split and less of the height - and men the opposite.<P>As for landing gracefully and quietly - both certainly take strength to accomplish. If you land with your weight back, you will land in a heavier fashion.<P>Notice I did not mention your arms? They are decorative.....they certainly help with their placement, but they do not lift you into the air. However, your head is vital - that must MUST be held up - never looking down. Looking down will kill everything.<P>Hope this helps.<P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited July 13, 2001).]


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