public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Fri Sep 19, 2014 9:56 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Attitude
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2001 4:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 442
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
If your turnout can't be held that well yet (ex., In attitude derrierd, my foot keeps falling lower than my knee), should you just work with a lower attitude until it gets better. Another question; my teacher always says that in atttutide the goal is to get your foot and knee at the same level-or your knee higher- but In a lot of pictures, I see attitudes derrriere with the foot way higher. Is that because of the winging of the foot, or is that just how it looks when your turnout is that good?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Attitude
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2001 5:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
This is an excellent question Bebounce...<P>Attitude derriere is probably one of the most beautiful lines in the ballet - however, if not done correctly - well - er - it is less than beautiful!!<P>There is no doubt that a good turnout helps. Both the height of the leg as a whole and the length of the attitude (how much the knee is bent) are based on individual attributes. The amount of turnout that you have, your ability to hold that turnout, and the length of your torso. Often it is felt that a more stretched out attitude is better for a person with a longer torso - the lines are more synchronous.<P>As for the height of the foot and knee. You teacher is right the knee and foot should be on the same horizontal line - but the foot can wing higher. However, if the attitude is held lower - less than hip high then of course the knee is higher than the foot.<P>I was always taught - and so taught my students that an exception to the rule - is when the attitude is exceptionally high - like above the waist - then the foot is higher than the knee. I could be wrong, but I was always told this was more of a Russian style - very high attitude in which the foot is higher than the knee.<P>So the rules might break down like this:<P>low attitude - below hip high - knee is higher than foot.<P>hip high attitude - knee and foot on same horizontal line.<P>high attitude - above the hip - and the foot is higher than the knee.<P>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Attitude
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2001 5:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
one more thing to add.....maybe a good way to think about attitude is - just like arabesque only with a bent knee. <P>If you were in arabesque at 90 degrees - would your foot and knee be on the same horizontal line? (except for a possible wing in the foot) Sure they would. So this is no different.<P>And the same if your arabesque was low - the knee would be higher than the foot. <P>And if your arabesque was above your waist - would the foot be higher than the knee? I think so.<P>So - think arabesque (turnout, pointed toe and all) and just bend your knee.<P><p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited June 07, 2001).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Attitude
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2001 10:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 242
Location: Washington St.
About the first part of the question: I was taught to only lift the leg as far as it could go with proper turnout. My guess is that otherwise you train your muscles to lift the leg in a turned-in position, which would be a difficult thing to overcome at a later date. Always work correctly, and then when the height comes you will have developed the proper technique to support it. Or so I've been taught.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Attitude
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2001 4:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
You were taught correctly Katheryn. One should never work beyond what can be held correctly - turn out, height, control, placement.<P>And you gave a great answer to the first part of Bebounce's question. Thank you.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Attitude
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2001 1:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
They are excellent response - really clear explanations. It is confusing when you see the pictures of top ballerinas doing what seems to be the opposite of what we ahve been taught - but those explanations above really clarify the situation.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group