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 Post subject: rolling in*
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2001 6:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 14, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 71
Location: ON,Canada
Hi everyone!<BR>I have a little problem in ballet. I always roll in at my ankles! i don't know how to correct this. When I think of it it's not too bad, but there are other things to concentrate on, so I forget and I roll in. Is there any suggestions on how to fix it?<BR>thanx

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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2001 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
This is a problem that really does need to be corrected - it can really add stress and eventually injury to the ankles, especially the ligaments.<P>You should talk to your teacher about this. You might be turning out too far. It could also be the fit of your shoes. But, it does need to be corrected.<P>Remember to feel the weight on all your toes - the little toe has to maintain contact with the ground.<p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited August 03, 2001).]


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2001 11:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 179
Location: Paris, France(but i'm from Cyprus)
I used to do that A LOT when I was younger. One day, my teacher put bandages on my foot, I can't exlain where, I think it's the ineer arch(???) so that when I was standing I wouldn't roll my ancles in. And I had them on for a week. That was it. I never rolled my ancles in ever again. I got used to standing correctly and it became natural. That happened when I was about 7, I think.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 2:41 am 
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Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 54
Location: uk
Maybe you should go to a physio for advice ... My ankles go like that and it has a direct effect on the alignment of my knees and hips as well.

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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 3:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
Rolling in could be from turning out too much, as Basheva has mentioned, or it could be because of the structure of your feet and ankles. It would be a good thing to ask your teacher's advice, since she/he can see what exactly is going on.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 5:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 01, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Mequon, Wisconsin, USA
I share this problem. It was actually discovered by my physical therapist though. It is part of the cause of my achillese tendonites. I however..do it all the time. My teachers always think that it is cuz i am turning out to far but its not...just thought i would share.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 5:54 pm 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Born2Dance - why do you think it is not because you are turning out too far?


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 6:35 pm 
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Location: ON,Canada
tell me more about the achilles tendon being a part of rolling in.<BR>thanx for your help guys.<BR>

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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2001 6:45 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Anytime that you use your body in a way it was not meant to be used - or move - like rolling in on your ankles, places stress on other parts of the body.<P>For instance, I had an adult student that complained of constant back pain. One day as she was putting on her street shoes, I noticed that the heels on her shoes were VERY worn down. This meant that every time she took a step her foot and alignment were working against each other.<P>I suggested to her that she buy a new pair of street shoes - which she did. The back pain went away almost immediately. <P>So it is not unusual that doing something like rolling in would affect many parts of your body - and certainly achilles tendonitis could be one of them. <P>Sometimes when you are in your street shoes, standing in line somewhere - like the supermarket - begin to notice how you are standing. I noticed one day that sometimes when I am standing in line at the supermarket, I roll out. This was my answer to some ligament pain I was having.<P>So it's not just what you do in ballet class which can place stress on various parts of the body. We inherently try to avoid pain, and sometimes in doing that - like limping - we place stress on other parts of the body. That's why its important to find out what is wrong, and if possible fix it, and that way avoid additional trouble.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2001 7:25 am 
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Location: Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
I try to take a look at students' feet and ankles when they are just standing and walking. Pronation is sometimes obvious in this simple examination. There is a difference between the rolling in caused by this structural weakness and the rolling in of an otherwise structurally sound foot and ankle because of turning out too much.<P>Of course, for the student who has structurally weak feet, turning out too much can make things even worse. And the question is: what can be done to help students with these weaknesses, beyond monitoring their turnout?


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2001 9:14 am 
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Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Also get your general dance posture checked out by your teacher. Sometimes positioning the back awkwradly can have knock on effects down the body i.e. on the knees and on the feet and ankles. I know it sounds silly but it is something worth considering. I say this because one of my students has lordosic tendencies in her lower back, this will make it look sometimes that her knees are bending when they are not and ahe also has a tendency to over turnout in relation to what her knees can do. When we concentrate on her posture and she corrects herself her turnout is not overtunred out and her feet stop rolling.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2001 2:56 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 01, 2001 11:01 pm
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Location: Mequon, Wisconsin, USA
I know that my problem is not caused by turning out to much because one of my teachers told me. I really have very mobile hips but because my feet naurally role it impeeds on my turnout. My physical therapist foud my problem but i still have not corrected it. One of the teachers at my summer program told me to think of it holding your arches up with your toes--she said it was ok touse your toes. SO i have been working..but let me tell you it is a constant struggle.


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2001 5:17 am 
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Location: Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
Born2dance, this is a tough one to fix, since your feet are the bottom of the line and have to support the weight of your body. It takes time and, as you said, constant awareness.<P>Has your physical therapist given you any exercises to help strengthen your feet?


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 Post subject: Re: rolling in*
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2001 5:18 am 
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Location: USA
Born2dance and dancerchic, here's an awareness exercise you can try out. It also does work the supportive muscles in your arches by activating theme.<P>Stand in your best alignment with your feet parallel and together. Hold your legs together by activating your inner thighs. You should feel your hips working also.<P>Now, lift your toes up as much as you can. You should now be able to feel that your arches have lifted. Lower your toes without losing that feel in your arches. Try not to "grip" the floor with your toes when you lower them. Lift and lower your toes several times to work the feeling of keeping your arches lifted. You can try a demi-plie in parallel with your toes lifted, and then one with your toes lowered, still trying to feel your arches lifted. You can do this in first, second, etc. It is very good for your feet. <P>The support of the arches comes from not just the arches themselves, but much of the leg being worked well, as muscles that go into the arch, also go up the leg. Good alignment in the pelvis and back, as Joanne mentioned is important also. <p>[This message has been edited by Maggie (edited August 06, 2001).]


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