public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:54 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 2:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Image <P>An important day for dance lovers in the UK, as the ROH announces its 2002-3 plans. As far as the Royal Ballet is concerned, it's going to be controversial, but I have to say that I'm excited by the repertory. I'm afraid that there will be much gnashing of teeth by some traditionalists as Mark Morris, Preljocaj and Kylian feature in the list.<P>Here is the link to the <A HREF="http://www.royalopera.org/PerformingSpaces/Index.cfm?ccs=238&aokeywords=&aoca=9&aocr=11" TARGET=_blank><B>introduction to the full programme by Tony Hall</B></A> on the ROH website.<P>The most crucial point next - what's the programme:<P><B>THE ROYAL BALLET 2002/03 REPERTORY - Summary</B><P>WHEELDON BALLET<BR>Christopher Wheeldon New Work<BR>Supported (2002) by The Dalriada Trust<P>GONG<BR>Mark Morris<BR>Supported (2002) by the Benefactors’ Circle<P>CARMEN<BR>Mats Ek<BR>22, 24, 25, 28 October, 4, 5, (8 schools mat) November at 7.30pm<P>***********************<P>MAYERLING – a ballet in three acts<BR>Kenneth MacMillan<BR>29, 30 October, 1, 2, 7, 11, 13, 14 November at 7.30pm<BR>16 November at 7pm<P>***********************<P>SWAN LAKE – a ballet in four acts <BR>Marius Petipa after Lev Ivanov <BR>Production – Anthony Dowell <BR>November, December 2002 <BR>Sponsored (1987) by The Linbury Trust Revival sponsored (2000) by The Linbury Trust<P>**************************<P>THE NUTCRACKER – a ballet in two acts<BR>Lev Ivanov and Peter Wright<BR>December 2002, January 2003<BR>Production – Peter Wright<P>***********************<P>SCÈNES DE BALLET<BR>Frederick Ashton<BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden<P>WINTER DREAMS<BR>Kenneth MacMillan<BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan<BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden<P>SINFONIETTA<BR>Ji r í Kylián<BR>Supported (2003) by The Friends of Covent Garden<BR>January 2003<P>************************<P>MANON – a ballet in three acts<BR>Kenneth MacMillan<BR>January, February, March, May 2003<BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan<P>************************<P>THE SLEEPING BEAUTY , New Production - a ballet in three acts<BR>Production - Natalia Makarova<BR>March, April 2003<BR>Supported (2003) by The Jean Sainsbury Royal Opera House Fund<P>************************<P>LE PARC – a ballet in three scenes<BR>Angelin Preljocaj<BR>April 2003<P>************************<P>THE PRINCE OF THE PAGODAS – a ballet in three acts<BR>Kenneth MacMillan<BR>April, May 2003<P>************************<P>SCÈNES DE BALLET<BR>Frederick Ashton<BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden<P>NEW BINTLEY BALLET<BR>David Bintley<P>SONG OF THE EARTH<BR>Kenneth MacMillan<BR>May 2003<P>************************<P><BR><B>THE ROYAL BALLET 2002/03</B><P>AN INTRODUCTION TO THE ROYAL BALLET 2002/03 SEASON<BR>BY ROSS STRETTON, DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL BALLET<P>The quest for new choreography is continous, occasionally frustrating, sometimes deeply rewarding, but always immensely challenging. It is one that must be pursued relentlessly but hopefully, one that can bring inspiration and fulfilment along the way. <P>This Season I am delighted to be able to include in our programme six ballets new to the repertory created by some of the finest choreographers in the world today. David Bintley, Mats Ek, Ji r í Kylián, Mark Morris, Angelin Preljocaj and Christopher Wheeldon are all recognised as being amongst the foremost exponents of their art form and I am enormously grateful that they have found time to work with the Company this Season. The diversity and range of their work will undoubtedly provide many exciting challenges for the dancers.<P>The 19th-century classics are the cornerstone of any great classical company’s repertory. In the autumn, Anthony Dowell’s production of Swan Lake returns, to be followed at Christmas by Peter Wright’s version of The Nutcracker. In March, completing the trilogy of Tchaikovsky ballets for the Season, I have invited Natalia Makarova to stage a new production of The Sleeping Beauty for the Company with designs by Luisa Spinatelli. In May, we pay homage to our founder, Dame Ninette de Valois, with a triple bill that includes a world premiere from David Bintley. Now Director of Birmingham Royal Ballet, Bintley was admired greatly by de Valois both as dancer and choreographer and he will dedicate the ballet, his first work for The Royal Ballet in ten years, to her. The remaining ballets in this programme are by the two choreographers most closely associated with The Royal Ballet, Frederick Ashton and Kenneth MacMillan.<P>Another focus of the Season will be the work of Kenneth MacMillan, whose extraordinary contribution to the dance world we remember on the 10th anniversary of his untimely death in 1992. Three of his full-length works, Manon, Mayerling and The Prince of the Pagodas, all of which were created for The Royal Ballet, will appear during the Season. His one-act masterwork Song of the Earth, which he created for the Stuttgart Ballet while he was director there, and Winter Dreams, one of his last works for The Royal Ballet, are also included.<P>This Season, in addition to the programme on the main stage, the artists of the Company will continue to explore further opportunities as dancers and choreographers, and extend their skills into other such areas as arts administration through their involvement in the ongoing projects in the Clore Studio Upstairs and the Linbury Studio Theatre. There is so much on offer throughout the House during the forthcoming year. Please join us in celebrating the best of the past and present and in heralding the future.<P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 27, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 3:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
<B>THE ROYAL BALLET 2002/03 REPERTORY - Full text</B><P>WHEELDON BALLET <BR>Christopher Wheeldon <BR>Supported (2002) by The Dalriada Trust<BR> <BR>GONG <BR>Mark Morris <BR>Supported (2002) by the Benefactors’ Circle<P>CARMEN <BR>Mats Ek<BR> <BR>22, 24, 25, 28 October, 4, 5, (8 schools mat) November at 7.30pm<P>The Season opens on 22 October with ballets by three contrasting choreographers, beginning with Christopher Wheeldon. Wheeldon has established himself as one of the finest classical choreographers of his generation. He began his career at the Royal Ballet School later joining The Royal Ballet. Now as Resident Choreographer with New York City Ballet, his work has won acclaim across America both on stage and screen. His latest work, which has its world premiere in May 2002, will undoubtedly build on the huge success of his previous Royal Ballet creations including Pavane pour une infante défunte in 1996 and There where she loves for The Royal Ballet ‘New Works’. Wheeldon’s new ballet uses James MacMillan’s orchestral composition, Tryst, which received its premiere in 1990 at the St Magnus Festival. Designer, Jean-Marc Puissant, will be working for the first time with The Royal Ballet, following last year’s successes designing for David Bintley’s The Seasons for Birmingham Royal Ballet and Wheeldon’s VIII for Hamburg Ballet.<P>Mark Morris will work with The Royal Ballet for the first time in bringing a ballet created for American Ballet Theatre. First seen at the Metropolitan Opera House in 2001, GONG is a ballet for ten women and five men. GONG is very much an ensemble piece incorporating an Indonesian texture from the music, costumes and choreography, resulting in an elegant balletic and formal piece. Mark Morris has set the ballet to Colin McPhee’s Balinese inspired Tabuh-Tabuhan. McPhee, who worked with the Institute of Latino Musicology in California, composed and first performed this score in Mexico City in 1930. Morris brings costume designer Isaac Mizrahi back to the Royal Opera House for the second time. Their previous collaboration being the critically acclaimed Platée performed by The Royal Opera in 1997.<P>Mats Ek is famous for his vividly theatrical alternatives of the classics and his take on Bizet’s celebrated opera in no exception. Created a decade ago for the Cullberg Ballet, a predatory Carmen leads the potent sexual games, while the pathos of the piece is left to rest with Don José. Mats Ek uses Georges Bizet’s score, transcribed for strings and percussion by Rodion Shchedrin, with designs by Marie-Louise Ekman that take a modern perspective on traditional Spanish motifs. Charles Barker conducts.<P>**************************<P>MAYERLING – a ballet in three acts <BR>Kenneth MacMillan <BR>29, 30 October, 1, 2, 7, 11, 13, 14 November at 7.30pm 16 November at 7pm <BR>as part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan Revival sponsored (1992) by The Friends of Covent Garden<P>Mayerling is the first of five ballets by Kenneth MacMillan in this Season, part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan marking the 10 th anniversary of his death. Last performed at the Royal Opera House in 1994 this three-act ballet is based on the true story of the Austro-Hungarian Crown Prince Rudolf. The double death of Rudolf and his mistress, the 17-year-old Mary Vetsera, at the royal hunting lodge of Mayerling in 1889, has been shrouded in mystery and intrigue ever since. The ballet places Rudolph at the centre of his corrupt and hypocritical court society, through his drug addled liaisons we see his descent into the arms of Mary Vetsera, his ruthless mistress. This emotional study of deeply flawed characters is MacMillan at his best, swinging wildly through a landscape of hatred, love and desire towards death. Mayerling is set to music by Franz Liszt, arranged and orchestrated by John Lanchbery, with libretto by Gillian Freeman and period designs by the late Nicholas Georgiadis. Barry Wordsworth and Graham Bond will conduct.<P>**************************<P>SWAN LAKE – a ballet in four acts Marius Petipa after Lev Ivanov <BR>Production – Anthony Dowell November, December 2002 <BR>Sponsored (1987) by The Linbury Trust Revival sponsored (2000) by The Linbury Trust<P>The enduring love story of a princess turned into a swan by an evil magician is danced to one of Tchaikovsky’s most memorable scores, with timeless choreography by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov. Tchaikovsky was commissioned to write Swan Lake for the Bolshoi Ballet in 1875, and the first version of the ballet, choreographed by Wenzel Reisinger, made its premiere in 1877. This began a rather chequered history, Joseph Hansen revised the ballet shortly after, only to be dropped completely six years later. In 1895 a new version choreographed by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa was danced by the Kirov Ballet and this is now considered the definitive version. Over time there have been countless new versions created both in the tradition of the original and as wildly abstract approaches. Anthony Dowell’s production, set in Russia at the turn of the 20 th -century, was created reinstating rarely performed choreography based on notations made in St. Petersburg before the 1917 revolution. Swan Lake is a ballet filled with spectacle and virtuosity performed against Yolanda Sonnabend’s Fabergé-inspired designs. Charles Barker conducts.<P>**************************<P>THE NUTCRACKER – a ballet in two acts Lev Ivanov and Peter Wright <BR>December 2002, January 2003 <BR>Production – Peter Wright <BR>Revival sponsored (1999) by The Friends of Covent Garden<P>Peter Wright’s revised staging of The Nutcracker returns to the repertory for the Christmas Season. The story, based on Hoffmann’s tale, tells how Drosselmeyer, a mysterious magician and maker of clocks and mechanical toys tries to break a curse that turned his nephew into a nutcracker doll. One magical Christmas Eve, the audience is drawn into a world of fantasy where Drosselmeyer has enlisted the help of a young girl, Clara to break the curse. There is grand battle between clockwork soldiers and the mice led by the Mouse King. With the defeat of the Mouse King, through Clara’s intervention, the curse is broken and the Nutcracker is transformed to his true self. He and Clara then travel through the magical Kingdom of the Sweets for a magnificent celebration with Drosselmeyer. Tchaikovsky’s sparkling score has all the magic of Christmas, and Julia Trevelyan Oman’s nostalgic designs will enchant adults and children alike. Valerie Ovsyanikov conducts.<P>**************************<P>SCÈNES DE BALLET <BR>Frederick Ashton <BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden <P>WINTER DREAMS <BR>Kenneth MacMillan <BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan <BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden <P>SINFONIETTA <BR>Ji r í Kylián <BR>Supported (2003) by The Friends of Covent Garden January 2003<P>Frederick Ashton described Scènes de Ballet as ‘just an exercise in pure dancing’. This one-act ballet, choreographed to Stravinsky’s score of the same title, is a complex and lively piece. Choreographed to the geometric studies of Euclid, Ashton intended that this ballet could be viewed from any angle and still ‘work’. Scènes de Ballet is a homage to 19 th -century classicism with designs by André Beaurepaire. Last performed at the Royal Opera House in 1992 it makes a welcome return this Season.<P>Winter Dreams began as the ‘Farewell’ pas de deux, danced by Darcey Bussell and Irek Mukhamedov, specially commissioned to celebrate Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother’s 90 th Birthday at the Palladium. Kenneth MacMillan extended this to a one-act ballet, with Winter Dreams making its premiere in February 1991. Inspired by and using the same characters, it is a study of the melancholy in Chekhov’s Three Sisters. The ballet, with subtle period designs from Peter Farmer, is danced to selected works from Tchaikovsky arranged by Philip Gammon and with additional music based on traditional Russian themes, arranged for guitars and mandolins by Thomas Hartman.<P>Ji r í Kylián’s one-act ballet Sinfonietta enters The Royal Ballet repertory for the first time, set to Janá c ek’s eponymous score with designs by Walter Nobbe. A very physical and uplifting piece, Sinfonietta is the second Kylián work to be danced by The Royal Ballet. In 1984 the Company first performed his one-act ballet, Return to the Strange Land. The Czech choreographer, discovered and nurtured by John Cranko, is celebrated for his fluency of movement and the broad emotional range his ballets cover. Charles Barker will conduct this programme.<P>********************************<P>MANON – a ballet in three acts <BR>Kenneth MacMillan <BR>January, February, March, May 2003 <BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan <BR>Sponsored (1974) by The Linbury Trust Revival supported (2003) by the Friends of Covent Garden<P>Kenneth MacMillan’s Manon has been one of the Company’s signature works since its creation in 1974. Based on Abbé Prévost’s L’Histoire du Chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut this magnificent ballet follows the fall of the central character, Manon, from Parisian courtesan to a fugitive in the Louisiana swamps. Despite falling in love with a young Parisian, Des Grieux, Manon agrees to a financial arrangement that her brother has made with a wealthy but elderly gentleman, Monsieur G.M. A victim of her own avarice, she persuades Des Grieux to cheat Monsieur G.M. out of more money at a card game. When they are discovered she is arrested as a prostitute and deported to America, followed by her lover. The ballet ends in a crescendo of rape, murder and Manon’s spiral into madness. Emotionally charged, Jules Massenet’s music, arranged by Leighton Lucas, from songs, piano pieces and arias (though none from his opera Manon) follows the protagonists through soaring heights of ecstasy to the depths of despair, all portrayed against Nicholas Georgiadis’s sumptuous regency designs. Graham Bond conducts.<P>******************************<P>THE SLEEPING BEAUTY , New Production - a ballet in three acts <BR>Production - Natalia Makarova <BR>March, April 2003 <BR>Supported (2003) by The Jean Sainsbury Royal Opera House Fund<P>Natalia Makarova will re-create the enduring fairytale, The Sleeping Beauty, the story of a Princess and her household sent into a slumber by the embittered and evil fairy Carabosse. A favourite with all ages, this new production of The Sleeping Beauty will be danced to Tchaikovsky’s original score with new designs by Luisa Spinatelli. Makarova, acknowledged as one of the greatest exponents of ballet, began her dancing career with the Kirov Ballet in 1959. After her defection to the West in 1970 she danced with nearly all of the world’s greatest ballet companies, and then pursued a stage career as a musical and comedy actress, for which she won an Olivier Award. The Sleeping Beauty will be her second production for The Royal Ballet. Performances will be conducted by Valery Ovsyanikov and Charles Barker.<P>******************************<P>LE PARC – a ballet in three scenes <BR>Angelin Preljocaj <BR>April 2003 <BR>Supported (2003) by the Benefactors’ Circle<P>Angelin Preljocaj, a classically trained dancer before studying contemporary dance, created the three-act ballet, Le Parc, for the Paris Opéra Ballet in 1994. It explores the various codes of conduct for love throughout the 17 th and 18 th -century French literature, from the innocence of inspirational love to licentiousness. Preljocaj takes the ballet through an evolving landscape as the games of love are played out, and the strategies of the lovers are laid bare for the audience. Danced against a highly symbolic and pastoral set by Thierry Leproust, with lavish costumes from Hervé Pierre, Le Parc uses some of Mozart’s most exquisite orchestral music alongside sound creation by Goran Vejvoda.<P>******************************<P>THE PRINCE OF THE PAGODAS – a ballet in three acts <BR>Kenneth MacMillan <BR>April, May 2003 <BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan <BR>With support from The Britten Estate Ltd<P>First performed at the Royal Opera House in December 1989, MacMillan’s The Prince of the Pagodas is danced to Benjamin Britten’s score, commissioned by John Cranko for his original ballet in 1957. When Kenneth MacMillan began the delicate process of strengthening and re-structuring the ballet’s narrative he employed the help of travel writer and novelist Colin Thubron, who initially thought ‘re-plot a ballet? How can you?’ However, The Prince of the Pagodas, often described as a combination of King Lear, Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella, was re-created and enriched to offer a mature approach to the fairytale genre. The story follows an ailing Emperor who decides to divide his kingdom unequally between his two daughters, Princesses Épine and Rose. Épine, the slighted daughter, lays a curse on the empire, transforming her sister’s beloved Prince into a salamander. Britten’s score was heavily influenced by Balinese music which he used as an authentic integration rather than a façade, in many ways making this work pioneering at the moment of conception. The oriental theme is followed through with Nicholas Georgiadis’s vivid designs. Richard Bernas will conduct.<P>******************************<P>SCÈNES DE BALLET <BR>Frederick Ashton <BR>Sponsored (1991) by The Friends of Covent Garden <P>NEW BINTLEY BALLET <BR>David Bintley <P>SONG OF THE EARTH <BR>Kenneth MacMillan <BR>May 2003 <BR>part of the international celebration of Kenneth MacMillan<P>David Bintley returns to choreograph a new work for The Royal Ballet. In 1980 Bintley began his choreographic relationship with the Company with Adieu, a successful debut followed by nine other ballets including Galanteries, the ever-popular ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café, and Tombeaux, the last ballet he choreographed for the Company.<P>Ashton’s Scènes de Ballet opens the programme with MacMillan’s the third part. Song of the Earth is set to Mahler’s great song cycle Das Lied von der Erde, the composer’s poignant farewell to the joy and beauty of the world, which uses settings of ancient Chinese poems. In this ballet, music, poetry and choreography combine to show that whilst our individual lives are short, the earth is in an eternal process of renewal. MacMillan’s imagery captures the essence and atmosphere of the poems and matches the elegiac beauty of Mahler’s score. Song of the Earth uses designs by MacMillan’s lifelong collaborator, Nicholas Georgiadis. The programme is conducted by Barry Wordsworth.<P><BR><B>SELECTIONS FROM THE REST OF THE PRESS RELEASE</B><P><BR><B>BEYOND THE MAIN STAGE AT THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE</B><P>Embracing the same values to which it aspires on its main stage, the Royal Opera House<BR>intends over the coming Seasons to offer a complementary programme of performances<BR>and events in and around the building with a focus on development of new artists, new<BR>audiences and new art.<P>The programme will include small-scale performance’s from the resident companies<BR>showcasing emerging talent and experimenting with new ideas; work from ROH<BR>Education; work under the umbrella of the Artists’ Development Initiative and<BR>performances and other events from the Vilar Young Artists.<BR>In addition, the Royal Opera House will put in place a series of partnerships with arts<BR>organisations, performing companies and individual artists to address and further<BR>common aims of supporting and developing new artists, welcoming new audiences and<BR>creating and presenting new art.<P>The first of these partnerships will be with two diverse and innovative companies: Music<BR>Theatre Wales and NITRO<P>Following on from their successful presentations of Peter Maxwell Davies’ The<BR>Lighthouse and Michael Berkeley’s Jane Eyre, Music Theatre Wales will work with the<BR>Royal Opera House over the course of the partnership to present contemporary chamber<BR>opera in the Linbury Studio Theatre. Their first presentation will be Nigel Osborne’s<BR>The Electrification of the Soviet Union.<P>NITRO will be collaborating with the Royal Opera House on music-theatre and dance-theatre<BR>projects including a unique version of its NITRObeat festival, NITRO at the<BR>Opera, to develop the work of black British composers writing for the classical voice.<BR>Partnerships with individual artists – Artists-in-House – will offer a range of individuals<BR>including composers, choreographers, visual artists, writers, digital artists and scientists<BR>the opportunity to collaborate with the Royal Opera House in exploring new ideas and<BR>presenting new work throughout the alternative spaces of the building.<P><BR><B>Linbury Studio Theatre</B><P>This Season, the Royal Opera House will present two new works specially commissioned<BR>for the Linbury Studio Theatre: Babette’s Feast, an opera for schools by John Browne,<BR>and for Christmas The Wind in the Willows, a family entertainment developed and<BR>choreographed by William Tuckett.<P><B>Clore Studio Upstairs</B><P>In the Clore Studio Upstairs, the established ADI programme will continue to offer a<BR>range of small-scale performance as well as creative and developmental opportunities to<BR>individual independent artists and ROH artists and personnel.<P>ADI exists to offer small-scale companies and independent artists the opportunity to<BR>access the resources and specialist expertise of the Royal Opera House; to provide an<BR>arena for experimentation and collaboration; to offer opportunities for continuing<BR>professional development to artists from both inside and outside the Royal Opera<BR>House.<P>Over its first two years, ADI worked with well over 250 artists including composers,<BR>dancers, musicians, visual artists, photographers, designers, writers, actors, film makers<BR>and over 30 choreographers. During the 2001/02 season, ADI supported 16 projects.<P><BR><B>EXHIBITIONS AT THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE</B><BR>SEPTEMBER 2002<BR>KENNETH MACMILLAN: PRINCIPAL CHOREOGRAPHER OF THE<BR>ROYAL BALLET (1977-1992)<P>The choreographer Kenneth MacMillan explored in his work subject matters and<BR>human relationships and behaviour in a way that changed the face of ballet. His works<BR>include dramatic dance dramas which portray searing, passionate and sometimes<BR>destructive relationships and behaviour. He trained at Sadler’s Wells (now the Royal) Ballet School and joined Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet in 1946. In 1952, he<BR>choreographed his first ballet Somnabulism, which was the highlight of the first evening of<BR>choreography given by the Sadler’s Wells Ballet Choreographic Group. Ninette de<BR>Valois commissioned him to create a ballet to Stravinsky’s Danses concertantes in 1955, the<BR>beginning of a long and fruitful relationship which was to lead to MacMillan becoming<BR>Director of The Royal Ballet from 1970 – 1977 and its principal choreographer from<BR>1977. <P>He died unexpectedly in 1992, during a performance of his Mayerling by The Royal<BR>Ballet at the Royal Opera House, in the theatre which had been his home.<BR>On the tenth anniversary of his death, the Royal Opera House Archives are mounting a<BR>retrospective of his early choreographic works for the two Royal Ballet companies, which<BR>were also the beginnings of his collaboration with designer Nicholas Georgiadis and<BR>dancer Lynn Seymour. The exhibition on the ground floor of the theatre, in the Vilar<BR>Floral Hall and the Amphitheatre Corridor will include costumes, head dresses, set and<BR>costume designs and photographs from Danses concertantes, House of Birds, The Burrow, Agon<BR>and The Invitation as well as from MacMillan’s first full length ballet Romeo and Juliet.<P>BLACK HISTORY MONTH<BR>During Black History Month, the Royal Opera House celebrates the contribution of<BR>black artists to The Royal Ballet and The Royal Opera with an exhibition in the Piazza<BR>Link.<P>2003<BR>RUDOLF NUREYEV[/b]<P>Rudolf Nureyev was the first high-profile Russian ballet defector to leap to freedom in<BR>the West in 1961. Shortly after, Ninette de Valois invited him to appear with Margot<BR>Fonteyn and The Royal Ballet in Giselle in 1962 and it was to be the beginning of a<BR>legendary partnership. Following the tenth anniversary of Nureyev’s death in 1993, an<BR>exhibition will recall the roles Nureyev danced with The Royal Ballet as well as ballets he<BR>staged for the Company. The exhibition on the ground floor, the Vilar Floral Hall and<BR>Amphitheatre Corridor will include costumes, set and costume designs and photographs.<P><BR><B>EDUCATION</B><BR>The Royal Opera House aims to be a valuable educational resource, supporting the<BR>lifelong learning, personal and professional development of people of all ages, interests<BR>and cultural backgrounds. There is a balance between new and innovative projects run<BR>over a comparatively short period and established programmes that have been designed<BR>to achieve long-term impact. Education activities also range from more traditionally<BR>educational, including insight days and pre-performance talks, to those that are largely for<BR>enjoyment and entertainment, such as Floral Dances and the popular Curtain Up<BR>Weekends. To ensure its contribution to the continuing development of the art forms of<BR>ballet and opera, Royal Opera House Education continues to commission new work and<BR>to offer ongoing professional development to staff and artists.<P>During the 2002/03 Season, the Royal Opera House will continue its already extensive<BR>education projects, currently reaching over 40,000 people each year, while building on<BR>new initiatives.<P><BR><B>THE EDUCATION PROGRAMME</B><P>CHANCE TO DANCE<BR>Supported by The Bernard Sunley Charitable Foundation, The Candide Charitable<BR>Trust, Christ Church Educational Foundation, The Daisy Trust, The Emily<BR>Temple West Trust, Freed of London, The Friends of Covent Garden, Mrs<BR>Marina Hobson, John Lyon’s Charity, Kobler Trust, Jane and Glenn Melrose, The<BR>Mercers’ Company, The Woo Charitable Foundation, Porselli, and the London<BR>Boroughs of Hammersmith & Fulham, Lambeth, and Southwark<BR>This exciting and successful project continues into its second decade. This September as<BR>the project team commences the annual programme of visits to schools in Lambeth,<BR>Southwark and Hammersmith & Fulham, Shevelle Dynott, one of the project’s first<BR>scholars, will enter the Royal Ballet Upper School. The project functions on a number of<BR>levels. 14,439 children have participated in the autumn lecture demonstrations and<BR>workshops and 572 children have been awarded scholarships which comprise special<BR>ballet classes in their local community, free dance kit, and associated activities and<BR>outings. Strong links are forged with the Royal Opera House and its performing<BR>companies with students attending performances and occasionally taking part in Royal<BR>Ballet productions. Members of The Royal Ballet have participated in the annual lecture<BR>demonstrations, and have performed with the children three times in the ROH Linbury<BR>Studio Theatre in short versions of The Nutcracker (November 1999), Coppélia (December<BR>2000) and La Fille mal gardée (March 2002).<P>18 children have been successful in gaining Local Education Authority grants and/or<BR>bursaries and have progressed to full-time training at vocational dance schools including:<BR>the Royal Ballet School (White Lodge); Arts Educational School (Chiswick); Arts<BR>Educational School (Tring); Elmhurst Ballet School; Northern Ballet School. In<BR>addition, 24 Chance to Dance students have also been successful in auditions for places on<BR>the Royal Ballet School Junior Associates programme, which offers Saturday classes for<BR>children who show exceptional talent.<P>* One of the aims of Chance to Dance is to ensure that, in the long term, no child will feel<BR>that the world of ballet is inaccessible.<P>OTHER PROJECTS INCLUDE<BR>CLORE DUFFIELD SCHOOLS’ MATINEES PROGRAMME offers six<BR>performances per annum (three operas, three ballets) with all seats at £5 and a<BR>programme of free preparatory activities for teachers and students. Those visiting the <BR>Royal Opera House for the first time are given priority for these popular and<BR>oversubscribed performances.<P><BR>BEHIND THE SCENES COURSE<BR>Supported by the JPMorgan Fleming Educational Trust<BR>This intensive annual course for students aged 18-22 has proved to be a popular strand<BR>of the Royal Opera House’s programme for students and young adults.<P>INSIGHT DAYS AND WORKSHOPS<BR>The extensive programme of in-house activities aimed predominantly at adults includes<BR>insight days and evenings, pre-performance talks and masterclasses. Activities for<BR>families include backstage tours, opportunities to watch The Royal Ballet in class and<BR>practical weekend workshops looking at specific operas and ballets. Monday Moves is a<BR>programme of weekly dance classes for blind and visually impaired adults held in The<BR>Royal Ballet’s studios.<P>FLORAL DANCES<BR>These overwhelmingly popular tea dances will take place throughout the 2002/03<BR>Season. Members of the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House in their new guise as the<BR>New Covent Garden Band, fill the Vilar Floral Hall with nostalgia as dancers take to the<BR>floor to relive the days when the Royal Opera House featured as one of the most popular<BR>dance venues in London.<P>TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT<BR>Ongoing training and professional development for Royal Opera House artists will<BR>continue. This will include courses plus opportunities for members of The Royal Ballet<BR>to study at degree level. In addition, artists will continue to be involved in planning,<BR>delivering and evaluating education projects.<P><B>ROYAL OPERA HOUSE PRICING STRUCTURE 2002/03</B><P>For the 2002/03 Season our primary objective has been to keep at least 50 percent of the<BR>seats for all performances regardless of repertory under £50. In order to offer a broad<BR>range of prices to our audiences and to reflect in greater detail the differing demands for<BR>certain repertory we have introduced several new pricing levels for individual<BR>productions. For example there is a new price band for two opera productions, Sophie’s<BR>Choice and Wozzeck. There is a total of 11 performances of these two productions, which<BR>will have a top price of just £50. The Royal Ballet performances of Le Parc will also<BR>have a price range from £3 to a top price of £44. We do however recognise that there is<BR>a higher demand for tickets for certain mainstream repertoire in both ballet and opera,<BR>and this is reflected in a new price category for three operas and three ballets.<BR>This new pricing structure means that for the 2002/03 Season:<BR>• 58% of all tickets for performances by The Royal Opera and The Royal Ballet cost<BR>£50 or less<BR>• 54% of all Royal Opera tickets cost £50 or less<BR>• all seats for the 11 performances of Sophie’s Choice and Wozzeck will cost £50 or less<BR>• 63% of all Royal Ballet tickets cost £50 or less<BR>• 31 performances by The Royal Ballet have a top price of £50 or less<BR>• All seats for ballet matinées will cost £44 or less – an increase of just £2<BR>• Nearly 500 seats for all ballet performances cost £14 or less (theatre capacity 2262)<BR>• More than half the House for a new production of full-length classical ballet will cost<BR>£45 or under<BR>• Lowest price for any ballet, regardless of repertory is just £3<BR>• The Royal Ballet’s performances of Le Parc will have a top price of just £44<BR>• Cheaper Friday and Saturday prices remain for the majority of productions<BR>• Prices for some productions of The Royal Opera start as low as £2<BR>• As in 2001/02 Season more than 480 seats for any performance of standard opera<BR>will cost £20 (there are 10 standard operas)<BR>• Half the House costs £50 or less for second year running<BR>• Schools’ matinées will remain at £5<BR>• 67 day seats are available for every performance<P><BR>In the 2002/03 Season there will be 138 performances by The Royal Ballet and 150<BR>performances by The Royal Opera<P>PRICES FOR THE ROYAL BALLET 2002/03 SEASON<BR>The Sleeping Beauty<BR>Mon – Sat £3, £6, £8, £14, £26, £37, £45, £55, £62, £70, £77<BR>The Nutcracker, Manon, Swan Lake<BR>Mon – Sat £3, £6, £8, £11, £25, £35, £43, £53, £58, £65, £73<BR>Mayerling, Coppèlia, The Prince of the Pagodas<BR>Mon – Thurs £3, £6, £8, £11, £23, £32, £40, £50, £55, £62, £70<BR>Fri – Sat £3, £6, £8, £11, £23, £32, £40, £44, £48, £53, £58<BR>Ballet Mixed Bills<BR>Mon – Thurs £3, £6, £8, £11, £23, £32, £40, £44, £48, £53, £58<BR>Fri – Sat £3, £4, £6, £8, £19, £28, £32, £35, £40, £45, £50<BR>Ballet Matinee<BR>£3, £4, £6, £8, £15, £19, £25, £30, £34, £38, £44<BR>37<P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 27, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 4:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Image <BR><small>Le Parc - Angelin Preljocaj; Elisabeth Maurin for Paris Opera Ballet</small><P><BR>Well it would be really churlish for me to criticise this season, as it contains 7 of the items in my 'Dream list'. The new pieces are an interesting balance. Two new works by neo-classicists, David Bintley and Christopher Wheeldon show Stretton doing his bit to help the ballet world push forward into the 21st Century. On the other hand, the inclusion of existing works by Mark Morris, Preljocaj and Kylian means that in two seasons Stretton has showcased dance by six of the leading choreographers alive today, the other three being Duato, Forsythe and Ek. 'Le Parc' by Preljocaj is the most fascinating and is bound to cause great controversy. I look forward to hearing the comments of some of our many French readers on this ballet. <P>The revival of 'Meyerling' and 'Prince of the Pagodas' plus 'Winter Dreams' and 'Song of the Earth' together with 'Manon' means that MacMillan will be celebrated in style.<P>Ashton fans will not be happy I suspect, feeling that 'Scenes de Ballet' leaves them short-changed. However, it is a beautiful ballet whch will provide an excellent test of the technique of the company. The second presentation may be the one to go for, when they have had a chance to live the piece. I hope that the 2003-4 season does redress the balance with more Ashton. It would have been a bold move, but 'La Fille...' instead of 'Nutcracker' would have been a way to address this imbalance. <P>The new 'Sleeping Beauty' will be fascinating of course, although I have to say that I would have commissioned a new production of 'Swan Lake' first. So all those, including me, who thought that last year's outing would be the last, have been proved wrong.<P>It's noteworthy that the Royal Ballet choreographers, Ashley Page, William Tuckett have not found a berth and neither will 2002-3 see a first for Cathy Marston on the big stage.<P>Overall, an exciting programme with much to look forward to. Congratulations Mr Stretton - I hope the sheduling of the programmes and the dancers permits a less hurried schedule than we have seen this year.<P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 27, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 4:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 9645
Location: Paris, France
Le Parc is one of the most beautiful creation made for POB these last years, dresses, set up, music by Mozart and Vejvodan, all is wonderful. It's a "magic" ballet I adore and we have the lick to see it again this season with Aurelie Dupont, Isabelle Guérin, Elisabeth Maurin, Manuel Legris, Laurent Hilaire and the premier danseur Yann Bridard.<BR>

_________________
http://www.danser-en-france.com/forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 5:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 218
Wow! That the planning for next season sounds excellent.<BR>I cannot wait to see Rojo and Guillem in Manon. I am especially looking forward to that one. So far I have only ever seen the Kirov production live and I have heard from varoius people that it was too prettyfied and that the RB production was much better.<P>Winter Dreams is another one I had put on my wish list. I wonder if Sylvie is going to make good on her word? In her letter to Sir Anthony Dowell that was printed in the "A Knight at the Ballet"-Gala programme she said she would never dance this ballet without him. Having both of them on stage on the same night, would it not be wonderful?<P>Isn't Le Parc the POB ballet that Nino was refering to as beatiful in her 'wish list' post?<P>Having Swan Lake on here means that I will not have to envy the Australians any longer who will get to see Cojocaru's debut in the role. Of course the RB has also so many other distinguished interpreters of Odette/Odile I think it will be hard to decide whom to see.<P>The mixed bills look pretty impressive too.<BR>I would not have thought I would get the chance to see Song of the Earth again so quickly. This worked really impressed me last May.<P>All in all I probably should start saving up for all those tickets now.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 5:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 38
Location: London, UK
The season coming up certainly looks exciting: what a mixture! <P>How will the modern pieces work? Will the choreographers be working directly with the Royal Ballet dancers? Will the RB be using dancers from the companies that usually dance those repertoires, or will they exclusively use RB dancers?<P>I do hope this encourages people to visit some of the excellent contemporary ballet companies that are to visit Sadlers Wells in the next few months. <P>Swan Lake should be excellent, and I look forward to Manon. <P>I do hope they don't cast Bussell as Mitzi in Mayerling as was previously done: she was horribly miscast, although she did a good job. <P>Although I have to say: Nutcracker?? Pleeeeeeeeeeeease. As a Christmas present to the dance world, could we please have one Winter season go past without that ballet? It has been danced to death: perhaps the Willis revenge in Giselle should be changed to forcing unfaithful men to watch the Nutcracker until they die from kitsch overload......<P>All in all, a great line up. It would appear that Ross Stretton has really brought some diversity to ROH. <P>I have to wonder what the more traditional critics are thinking... I think there are definitely some editors' offices I would like to be a fly on the wall in, right now!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 7:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
<B>The press conference</B> for the new season launch raised some interesting points and one of the leading London based critics phoned in this account to criticaldance: <P>Overall Ross Stretton was relaxed and handled some, at times, very robust questionning with aplomb. Here are some of the highlights:<P><B>New dancers</B><BR>(current company in brackets)<P>Robert Tewsley (Stuttgart Ballet) <BR>Jose Martin (Boston Ballet)<BR>Isobel McMeekan (Birmingham Royal Ballet)<BR>Valerie Hristov (Pacific Northwest Ballet)<BR>Tim Matiakis (Royal Swedish Ballet)<BR>Andrej Uspenski (Royal Danish Ballet)<P>Overall the number of dancers will be increased to 88, the highest ever.<P><B>Orchestral playing for ballet</B><P>It was acknowledged that this could be a problem and meetings were taking place at the ROH to work out a plan to tackle this problem. Antonio Pappano also acknowledged the special qualities necessary for conducting ballet. He is planning to conduct ballet from his second season at the ROH. <P><B>Injuries</B><P>Ross Stretton completely rejected that the mix of styles of dance or workload in the current period was causing the injuries to dancers which has been reported in the Press. He pointed out that Alina Cojocaru's foot injury was long-standing and that 7 of those injured had resulted before his time at the RB. He is a great believer in fitness as a way to minimise these inevitable problems. Pilates and earlier attention for injured dancers was mentioned as part of their current approach. <P><B>Dance on the Big Screen</B><P>This scheme will be extended to the English regions.<P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 27, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 8:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 218
Thanks Stuart, that is very interesting.<BR>As far as injuries are concerned the one thing that really caught my attention in the press recently was the article by Ismene Brown. She said that Guillem had told her that she had refusde to do both Giselle and Mats Ek's Carmen within a short period of time. Assuming this was not just a matter of Sylvie wanting everything her way I think her opinion is worth thinking about.<P>It seems to me that some dancers are more prone to suffering injuries than others and to utterly reject the idea that a heavy workload with very different styles 'might' cause problems at least for indiviuals seems to oversimlify the matter somewhat.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2002 11:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Article in The Telegraph by Ismene Brown. She does not seem overly impressed at the drop in numbers of performances next season.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The next Royal Ballet season confirms what has been widely feared - a remorseless decline in the company as a creative organism within British culture. A few figures serve as evidence.<P>There will be 15 ballets performed next year, on 10 bills. Three are variety bills, the rest full-lengths. The mainstream news of the year is the replacement of the unlamented £600,000 1994 production of Petipa's The Sleeping Beauty with a production by Natalia Makarova, with designs by Luisa Spinatelli, who has designed for Paris Opera Ballet and the Bolshoi<BR><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2002/03/28/btroh28.xml&sSheet=/arts/2002/03/28/ixartright.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited March 28, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2002 1:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 02, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 329
Location: Scotland.UK
Do i read this right..they are doing Sir Anthonys Swan Lake?? I thought they were dying to get rid of it?? Well i'll be there to see it along with the Nutcracker and a few others.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2002 1:34 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
That's right spf. I'll be looking forward to Alina Cojocaru's Odette/Odile.<p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 28, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2002 6:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
And the story from the AP:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>New productions, diversity characterize 2002-3 Royal Opera House season<P>MATT WOLF, Associated Press<P>LONDON - Diversity appears to be the crucial word for the forthcoming Royal Opera House season, starting in September. It will include six new opera productions and a major new ballet production during the 49 weeks that Britain's flagship venue for opera and dance is lit.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020327/ap_wo_en_ge/britain_opera_house_11 target=_blank>More</a>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2002 3:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 71
Location: London, UK
Hmmm....<BR>My verdict is...Great! 8/10 for Mr Stretton on the basis of this. Variety, boldness, new productions, in tandem with a thoughtful approach to the heritage (well, he has to have Nutcracker, doesn't he?). Good for him. Mark Morris and Angelin Prelocaj: excellent. Let's hope Le Parc banishes stuff like Beyond Bach once and for all. <BR>Drawbacks? Well, I'd be tempted to go for a new Swan Lake production too, but I expect that the coffers wouldn't run to that and the Makarova Beauty. Stuart has rightly noted that there's no place, at present, for home grown choreographic talent apart from Bintley. Ashton? We all knew that next year was the Year of MacMillan, so I think we can give Mr Stretton the benefit of the doubt. <P>Next on the wish list? Well, announcing casts in good time, please. Not overloading Rojo with every opening night for every ballet. More opportunities for soloists and first soloists. <P>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2002 1:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
<B>Royal Opera House pulls in younger audiences</B> <BR>BY DAVID LISTER MEDIA AND CULTURE EDITOR, The Independent <P><BR>A NEW, younger audience has been attracted to the Royal Opera House, changing the institution's stuffy image, says its new management team.<P>A survey of ticket-buyers showed that nearly a quarter were now aged under 35 - with half earning less than pounds 30,000 a year. Overall, in the first season at the redeveloped Royal Opera House, 53 per cent were new audience members. In the second season, 2000-01, 52 per cent were new and, this season, the figure so far stands at 32 per cent.<P>Tony Hall, who moved from head of news at the BBC to become executive director at the ROH last year, said yesterday: "The more we are reaching out to new people the happier I am." He added that, as a northerner, he wanted more of the audience to come from outside the South-east.<P><A HREF="http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020328004049&query=ballet" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><P>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet: 2002-3 Programme Announced
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2002 3:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
<B>New fans flock to Opera House</B><BR>from the BBC website<P> <BR>The Royal Opera House (ROH), London, is attracting more and more first time visitors, with a third of bookings from people new to the venue, according to new research. <BR>The findings back the ROH's claims that it is attracting a less elitist audience. <P>Last month they published another report which showed one fifth of opera goers were under 35 years old - and a similar proportion earn less than £15,000 per year. <P>And more than half of opera goers have an income less than £30,000, said the research by the consultants Experian.<P> <A HREF="http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/entertainment/arts/newsid_1898000/1898441.stm" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A> <P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 29, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group