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 Post subject: Cabaret
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2002 11:03 pm 
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Review in The Evening Standard of a production of this classic Kander and Ebb musical. <P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>I never imagined I could be overwhelmed by a tiny-scale, studio production of the spectacular Kander-Ebb musical about clubland decadence and amours in Weimar Berlin just before the Nazis took over. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/review.html?in_review_id=629859&in_review_text_id=609343" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 11:06 pm 
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Article in The Independent of a production in rehearsal at Chichester whose director has been released for being too raunchy.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The director of a new production of Cabaret at the Chichester Festival Theatre has left in the middle of rehearsals after the head of the theatre told her that her ideas were too raunchy for the populace of West Sussex.<P>The production has now been thrown into chaos with the leading actor and other members of the team resigning in protest.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/news/story.jsp?story=315329" TARGET=_blank><B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 11:12 pm 
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Time was when the Chichester Festival was seen as one of the most significant theatre events in the calendar. It looks as though those days are lone gone if its aim is to supply safe productions to the Sussex bourgeoisie.<p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited July 17, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2002 1:31 pm 
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I agree Stuart - what is Cabaret supposed to be if not raunchy.


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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2002 4:37 am 
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Review of the Chichester production in the FT. Things seem to be getting interesting there.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Life has been a cabaret at Chichester this summer. Artistic director Andrew Welch, brought in to wean the local audience off its addiction to Penelope Keith appearing in Noel Coward, chose the imaginatively spiky Lucy Bailey to direct a revival of Cabaret.<P>Bad idea: Welch was so shocked at the nudity at early rehearsals that Bailey retired hurt and Roger Redfarn was brought in as a late replacement, charged with making a musical set in a Berlin brothel during the decadent early 1930s more cosy.<P>Then suddenly Welch announced his own retirement, to be replaced by the most impressive theatrical trio since the Three Degrees, with the very experienced but scarcely cosy Ruth Mackenzie in pole position, supported by the equally bold Steven Plimlott and Martin Duncan. Suddenly Chichester looks cutting-edge.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1028185353564&p=1016625900929" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And in the Times.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>THIS production of musical theatre’s darkest gem begins with a welcome that could hardly be described as warm. To the pulsing opening bars of Wilkommen, Julian Bleach as the Emcee, ashen-faced and hollow-eyed, rises through a trapdoor. When he sings, or rather snarls, “Bleibe, reste, stay!”, it’s less an invitation than an unsmiling order. Then the dancing girls and boys of the Kit Kat Klub trickle on to the stage, wearing winter coats over their gaudy underwear like cheap hookers on a chilly street corner. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,685-371937,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A> <P>And in the Standard.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>One can only wonder quite what Welch expected from this most gloriously seedy of musicals, set in the decadent, anything-goes Berlin of the early 1930s. Replacement director Roger Redfarn has stayed resolutely on message, with the result that, despite the occasional energetic bout of bump and grind, the atmosphere in the Kit Kat Klub is strangely lacking in depravity. Julian Bleach's ill-judged Emcee looks uncomfortable rather than threatening, and even that celebration of the threesome, Two Ladies, is drained of its sexuality by the decision to clothe the three concerned in exercise wear. Coxed pairs, anyone? <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/review.html?in_review_id=655985&in_review_text_id=626902" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And The Guardian.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Inevitably no main-house production can achieve the devastating intimacy of Sam Mendes's 1993 Donmar Warehouse revival; that made us guiltily complicit Weimar voyeurs. What we get instead at Chichester is a garish George Grosz-style spectacle. In The Kit Kat Club itself at least half the satin-knickered, fishnet-stockinged dancers turn out on closer inspection to be men. At one point, in an apparent echo of Broadway's The Producers, we are confronted by a line of high-kicking, precision-drilled Nazi chorus girls. Even the contentious Two Ladies is effectively staged on a vaulting horse with the lubriciously mounted Emcee sandwiched between two female gymnasts. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/reviews/story/0,11712,767830,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited August 02, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2002 9:32 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Cabaret
"Cabaret" at the Festival Theatre, Chichester. By Alexandra Jay in The Stage


A year ago, as an understudy, Alexandra Jay made musical theatre history when at short notice she took over and triumphed as the National's Eliza Doolittle. Now she stars in her own right as Sally Bowles, with a fetching Louise Brooks bob, in a Chichester main house production of this Kander and Ebb classic.

The revival at the Festival Theatre has not been without its backstage traumas. Director Roger Redfarn replaced Lucy Bailey following artistic differences, no credit is listed for the awkward set design, while Mark Bouman was brought in to realise Angela Davies' costume sketches. And with Garth Hall's over-loud orchestra concealed in a glazed box at roof level, other aspects of the production raise question marks about interpretation.

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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2002 10:25 pm 
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Review from The Sunday times. (please scroll down)

Quote:
This is the real thing. It is easy to get this musical wrong, because of its background of rising Nazism: either you do it too crudely or you trivialise it. I have seen it done both ways, and it makes a nonsense of John Kander’s music and Fred Ebb’s lyrics, both of which are poised on a knife’s edge between tragedy and irony.
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 Post subject: Re: Cabaret
PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2002 10:18 pm 
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Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Article in the Times that discusses what Cabaret is today.

Quote:
The curtain may have fallen on cabaret's traditional venues but this most personal of theatrical forms is finding new and unusual homes



No one is quite sure what cabaret is any more, let alone where to find it. An art form that was born in Paris in the 1880s and later flourished in pre-Nazi Germany and postwar Manhattan, its appeal has been dwindling but somehow it refuses to die. Nowadays people tend to associate the term, if they recognise it as a distinct genre at all, with the eponymous Liza Minnelli film based on the musical currently being revived at the Chichester Festival Theatre.

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