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 Post subject: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2002 11:07 pm 
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Feature in The Guardian.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>To any clued-up fan, the full title of Robyn Orlin's current hit work, Daddy I've Seen This Piece Six Times Before and I Still Don't Know Why They're Hurting Each Other, will suggest a satire on the obfuscation and emotional masochism of certain kinds of modern dance. One strand of the Johannesburg-based choreographer's piece is certainly a parodic take on different dance trends. <P>Her five dancers are a keen but nervous group of performers who have been inexplicably abandoned by their choreographer. Desperate to get their show on the stage, they flail around, putting together bits and pieces of material, rummaging through their available turns, exhorting each other to do better, and trying to explain themselves to their audience. In formal terms, the piece takes an anarchic route around a range of idioms from traditional black African dance, to ballet, to Broadway musical numbers. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4461311,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2002 11:36 pm 
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Image <BR><small>Robin Orlin and friends</small><P>This looks intriguing, but it seems to have crept into London without much publicity. So hats off to Judith Mackrell for highlighting it. I shall try to see it later in the week.<P>Here are the details from the <A HREF="http://www.barbican.org.uk/generic/details.asp?eventID=1129&artFormID=4&artForm=Theatre&disciplineName=dance" TARGET=_blank><B>Barbican website</B> </A> <P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited July 15, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2002 1:14 pm 
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It certainly sounds intriguing. I hope you do get to see it Stuart it would be good to hear your views.


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2002 11:57 pm 
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Review in The Guardian.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The five dancers in search of a choreographer in Robyn Orlin's Daddy, I've Seen This Piece Six Times Before and I Still Don't Know Why They're Hurting Each Other . . . are an anxious bunch. They are visiting London for the first time from Johannesburg and, according to the dramatic conceit of the show, have been abandoned by Orlin to get their act together by themselves. The mayhem that ensues is sometimes rampant anarchy, sometimes viciously pointed comedy. But it always has a charm that only an audience with a heart of stone could resist. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4463683,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2002 3:21 am 
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The Standard sent their not-easy-to-please Drama Critic along....and he writes one of the strongest reviews I have ever seen from him:<P><B>Daddy, I've seen this piece six times before and I still don't know why they're hurting each other...</B><BR>By Nicholas de Jongh for The Evening Standard <BR> <P>Laughter is the best medicine, they say, and if they're right, Robyn Orlin is a very fine doctor. The South African choreographer draws on the complex, difficult, happy-sad land of her birth and turns it into the gentlest comedy. <P>With speech, drama, caricature and dance, she pokes fun at some of our most sacred cows - ballet and ethnic traditions, middle-aged white women and buxom black ones. Back stage luvvies and African serving boys are also in the mix, as is a traditional English sword dance team whose intricate daisy-chain dancing is every bit as complex as Balanchine's choreography, albeit with a much beefier gait. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/dance_review.html?in_review_id=643637&in_review_text_id=614441" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A> <P><BR> Image <BR><small>"in a corner the sky surrenders..."</small><P>Here's a link to a <A HREF="http://pages.ripco.net/~eleon/Robyn_Orlin/" TARGET=_blank><B>webpage about an earlier piece by Robyn Orlin.</B></A><P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited July 21, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2002 10:23 pm 
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Review in The Telegraph.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Robyn Orlin's Daddy, I've seen this piece six times before and I still don't know why they're hurting each other has a long title and big pretensions; but it's a small, genial, puzzling piece. Orlin comes from Johannesburg, where apparently she is a controversial performance voice, no easier with the "Rainbow Nation" than with apartheid.<P>The art of getting attention through a good title has yet to be discovered by the dance world (Swan Lake - now there's an uninspired title), and Orlin certainly wins on that score, seeming to promise satire on modern dance's inscrutability as well as domestic violence. She describes the piece as being about the politics of space, space being the theatre as well as the confused and confusing world that is modern South Africa.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F07%2F19%2Fbtdance.xml" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And in The Times.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>ROBYN ORLIN is one of the new darlings of the European dance festival circuit. The fortysomething South African choreographer-director finds verbal gags, outrageous visual camp and novelty songs irresistible. But her ironist’s love of kitsch carries the sting of post-apartheid social critique. <BR>Daddy, I’ve seen this piece six times before and I still don’t know why they’re hurting each other . . . , Orlin’s London debut, is stuffed with ideas. This frisky and, on the surface, risky political entertainment hinges on a Pirandellian conceit. The choreographer hasn’t shown up, but the show — or dress rehearsal, for that’s what this deliberately shambolic exercise feels like — must go on. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,685-359446,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 19, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2002 12:53 am 
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Review in The Sunday Times (please scroll down article).<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>At the Barbican Pit came something completely different: a UK debut for The City Theater and Dance Group, from Johannesburg, in an event irrelevantly titled Daddy, I’ve seen this piece six times before and I still don’t know why they’re hurting each other ... Created by Robyn Orlin, this was a jovial piece of anarchic comedy in the manner of Pina Bausch meets Monty Python. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2101-358538,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And in The Observer.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>South African Robyn Orlin's London debut, a post-apartheid satirical revue, is as teasing as its title: Daddy, I've seen this piece six times before and I still don't know why they're hurting each other <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,758975,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 21, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2002 11:35 pm 
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<B>Stand up for the new South Africa</B><BR>By Nadine Meisner for The Times<P>On paper it sounded like one of those dance-theatre pieces where performers rush about and screech their lines while the audience sits cold and uninvolved. But you don't sit during Robyn Orlin's piece – or you can if you want, but on the floor, or one of the few benches around the central, raised platform. And while Daddy, I've seen this piece six times before and I still don't know why they're hurting each other is a mouthful of a title, it encapsulates a piece that, on one level, comments on dance and some of its body-wrenching cliches; and, on another, on the topsy-turvy politics of today's South Africa.<P>A beautiful woman (Neli Xaba) begins the show, making swaying moves, her velvet dress hiding the stool under her feet, so she looks like an elegantly elongated ebony carving. Below her, the technician, Nico Moremi is busy preparing the stage and trying to satisfy her every whim – cold water, but no ice, some protein to eat, preferably scrambled eggs – until he rebels and hustles her off.<P><A HREF="http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/reviews/story.jsp?story=317413" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Robin Orlin's Daddy
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2002 12:15 am 
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<B>"Daddy" - some quick thoughts</B><P>Nadine Meisner's review above sums up many of my own thoughts on one of the most enjoyable and distinctive performances we are likely to see in London this year. <P>This superb evening of dance theatre examines attitudes and the current problems of South Africa rather than the gloomy introspection that one frequently sees from this dance form. I understand that Robyn Orlin has recently made a piece on the Aids crisis in South Africa, which is much darker. Thus, the choreographer chooses from a range of styles and moods according to the subject.<P>Apart from the huge fun, which appears chaotic but is of course meticulously choreographed, there is quality dance in the brief African and show dance sections and the delightful Busby Berkeley hommage. The exquisite Neli Xaba has a solo about a third of the way through which would look good anywhere and ends with a couple of perfectly executed barrel jumps in a confined space. So, when this fine dancer appeared later in a white tutu, it had a deep resonance for the UK as well as South Africa. As she sprinkled white flour over her arms and legs I wondered how long it would be before we see a black dancer in one of the UKs major ballet companies. <P>One thing I hadn't reckoned on was being drawn into the production. In the foyer beforehand a scatty woman was trying to sell her ticket, as she maintained that she had been told it was ballet. I actually spent a minute or so telling her how well the London critics had reviewed "Daddy" before the penny dropped that she was part of the show. How delicious! The woman, played by Toni Morkel, "interrupts" the production from time to time extolling the virtues of classical ballet and totally misunderstanding the dancing of Neli Xaba. It all seemed a bit far fetched until I thought of Katherine Kanter's article in which she comdemned the French authorities for supporting hip-hop in the poor areas of Paris.<P>One correction from the reviews in the national dailies - in one report the English folk dance group were described as "clog dancers" and in another as "Morris dancers". In fact they are a Sword or Rapper dance group with nary a clog to be seen and jolly good they were too.<P>At the end I boogied with one of the dancers while beating red plastic plates together behind her back. Like Nadine Meisner, I would have gone again the following night if I could. <P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited July 23, 2002).]


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