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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2001 1:57 am 
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<B>Ismene Brown reviews Onegin performed by the Royal Ballet at the Royal Opera House</B><P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>THERE are unprecedentedly long runs of the Royal Ballet's classic offerings under its new director Ross Stretton, a bonus in the case of Cranko's Onegin, if less so in the case of the 19th-century Petipa classic Don Quixote. With its realistic dramatic style, deeply drawn characters and more modern ballet idiom, Onegin fits the Royal Ballet's MacMillanesque side exceedingly well, evident with any of the casts.<P>No other quartet has matched the emotional unity and dramatic impulse of the first-night team, Tamara Rojo, Adam Cooper, Alina Cojocaru and Ethan Stiefel, but there have been several strong interpretations on other nights.<P>Tatiana has been the most problematic role to place. This is not Pushkin's Tatiana or even the Tatiana of Tchaikovsky's opera Eugene Onegin - this is Cranko's Tatiana, and he originally thought of her as the fortysomething Fonteyn. Though she starts naive and maidenly, she ends married and 10 years older, and needs the experience and passion to show the weathering of some highly complicated emotions. When young dancers are cast, the ballet makes gains at the start but losses at the end, however urgently they act.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P> <BR> <BR><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/et?ac=005760794236107&rtmo=qeL9s9u9&atmo=rrrrrrrq&pg=/et/01/12/19/btisme19.html" TARGET=_blank><B>more...</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2001 8:51 am 
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When I have read all the reviews of Onegin I am struck by one inconsistency — Tatiana's age. Several reveiwers say that she starts off as a teen - bookish and alone - I am thinking maybe late teen — a nineteen-year-old, as she has a younger sister old enough to be engaged or seriously invovled.<P>In the film, Ralph Fiennes as Onegin comes back after 6 years away — in the ballet I have read he is gone 10 years. Ok, now this makes Tatiana a whopping 29 years old at most- and not the middle-aged woman everyone is saying she is. If Cranko imagined her as the fortyish Fonteyn then there is some serious mathmatical miscalculations going on here!


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2001 1:34 pm 
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lara, you make a good point. Flicking back over Pushkin's novel, and from what I can remember, I don't think we are told how many years Onegin spends in the Wilderness, but we're told he's 26 when he returns. He's clearly not been away 10 years. So clearly Tatiana is not middle-aged. <P>On the basis that girls would have been betrothed in that class from about 15 years of age, and Olga is younger, I thought Tatiana to be between 16 and 19 at the beginning and mid 20s, late 20s at the very most, at the end. Pushkin was killed in his late 30s so he would have seen a small amount of years as a large chunk of a life in his protrayal which may be why some interpreters calculate more years - ie the older we are, the shorter 5 years or so seems.<P>I suppose it was the quality of the tragic in Fonteyn's dancing and personal life that led her to be cast in roles of all age groups - notwithstanding her age, she was cast as the courtesan in Marguerite and Armand, yet the story is based on Dumas' "La Dame aux Camelias" in which the courtesan is very young - only about 20 when she dies.


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2002 6:26 pm 
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17/1/02<P>There isn't really much one can add to all that's been said about Onegin. Last night a packed house saw another impeccable performance by both Robert Tewsley and Mara Galeazzi. <P>Tewsley dances more beautifully than anyone I've ever seen. He's incredibly lyrical and light on his feet, his jumps seem weightless and his pirouettes are so fast and don't move a millimetre off mark. His Onegin is so self-absorbed and condescending - in his first pdd with Tatiana it is clear who is dictating the dance. I really hope the RB has room for him to guest again in the near future.<P>Mara was wonderfully passionate from where I was sitting. Her final pdd with Tewlsey was beautifully detailed down to her trembling hands. I think I agree that she makes the transition from young girl to mature woman the best (though not necessarily the best Tatiana - I think it's pretty much even between Rojo, Cojocaru and Galeazzi).<P>I don't think anyone can match Alina in her portrayal of Olga. She's such an incredibly bright presence on stage and outshines nearly everyone in her wake. Her Olga is such an innocent, blissfully unaware of the damage her flirtations will wreak.<P>Putrov was a fair Lensky. I thought his reactions to Olga's flirting were a little muted - not nearly as harsh as I thought the role called for. But his solo in the moonlight in Act II was very moving nonetheless. This solo along with the dancing leading up to the duel is my favourite of all.<P>I also thought the corps also looked in great form last night - some sections had noticeably improved from December. <P>I'd seen so many Onegins last year (I'm not saying how many - it's too embarassing!) I thought maybe I wouldn't be so taken by it all anymore, but no worries. It's still fresh and beautiful and I'm looking forward to Rojo and Cooper's final performance on Saturday, and Cojocaru and Kobborg next week.<P>On the subject of Tatiana's age, I'm not too sure but I thought I remember reading that only 2 years had passed between Acts II and III. Not a very significant amount of time! Adam Cooper spoke in an interview that 10 years had passed so that's the number I'd take in reference to just the ballet.<P>Final note - the house really was full to the bursting right up to the upper and lower slips. The situation is the same for Cojocaru-Kobborg performances on the 24th and 29th - only lower slips and standing seats at the very back of amphitheatre are left. Rojo-Cooper on Saturday is completely sold out with just the day seats left. I'd highly recommend both - Alina and Johan are incomparable while Tamara-Adam-Alina have a kind of starry quality that I think rarely happens on stage all at once.<p>[This message has been edited by sylvia (edited January 17, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2002 6:39 pm 
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Odile, this is a bit late but I did see Tapper in the matinee in December. I couldn't think of anything to say on that particular performance because the evening show with Alina and Johan completely blew me away. Tapper dances a very respectable and convincing Tatiana though it's not really comparable to Rojo, Cojocaru or Galeazzi. For example I thought she lacked the desperation the others displayed in Act III. <P>Coppen looked a little too sweet to be cruel when he first walked out in Act I. Again he was good, quite convincing, but lacked the icy coldness of Tewsley, the cruelty of Cooper or the psychological depth of Kobborg. He didn't have a distinctive edge that the other three had. I'd still recommend Tapper and Coppen though because they're still good to watch and it's fun comparing. I'm a bit curious as to why some of their performances were pulled freom them. I would have loved to have seen them as Olga and Lensky! Anyway it's been more than a month, they may have improved considerably.


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2002 4:38 am 
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I was there too Sylvia and I'm embarressed to say it was my first 'Onegin', but I plan to go again next week. Like you I was very impressed both with the work and the individual performances. Overall a superb evening of dance and a credit to all involved. Ross Stretton deserves much praise for bringing this great work into the Royal's rep. <P>


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2002 2:14 am 
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There is an interesting description of the recent "What to look for in John Cranko" Insight Evening at the Royal Opera House by Suzanne McCarthy on ballet.co.<P>Here is the direct link to the <A HREF="http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2440.html" TARGET=_blank><B>Cranko article</B></A>.


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2002 2:39 am 
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Sylvia - I am impressed that you have been so many times. The combination of the magic of the performance and the magic of Pushkin's verse-novel, really make it compelling stuff - it's only like re-reading your favourite poem many times!!


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2002 1:12 am 
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Short review in The Observer (please scroll down).<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Short of leading men, the Royal Ballet is relying on guests while bringing on youngsters in its ranks. Ivan Putrov is the latest to be given a stab at Lensky in Cranko's Onegin. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,636048,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2002 1:51 am 
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Emma, I'm still not done yet! Alina and Johan are really special themselves so I'll be watching them again next week. But your poem analogy is absolutely spot-on!<P>I did see Rojo and Cooper last night and they were extraordinary - definitely the best I've ever seen them. From a dancing point of view, Tewsley is the stronger dancer. But Adam's acting I thought was incomparable throughout the ballet, and seemed to hold nothing back in the final minutes. Likewise Rojo was wonderfully passionate and she WAS Tatiana for me. I'll never forget the look on her face when she ordered Onegin out of her life, and the instant panic and regret after. Last night probably ranks as one of my favourite performances ever, on par with Alina and Johan.<BR><p>[This message has been edited by sylvia (edited January 20, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2002 8:58 am 
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That is QUITE a claim so I extremely sorry to have missed it. I was reading Onegin in the bath again this morning.It is interesting to see what parts are highlighted by the choreography, for example, and where there are changes.


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 8:41 am 
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Poor Ms Flanders, another grim evening for her at the Royal Ballet with the wonderful "Onegin". An ex-ballet dancing critic friend told me that Mara was exceptional last night.<P><B>Saved by a lone hero</B><BR>by Judith Flanders in The Evening Standard<P><BR>Pushkin once said that he would give all of French literature for one work by the choreographer Didelot. It is hard to know if he would have said the same of John Cranko. <P>Cranko's Onegin has become a classic by stealth here. Long ignored by the Royal Ballet, it has crept into the repertoire almost while we were looking the other way. It is resolutely old-fashioned: plush, velvety sofas cover the stage, cobweb-like lace hovers overhead. <P>And on stage is either a tired old warhorse of honour betrayed, or an emotionally compelling drama of the birth of the anti-hero, depending on who is dancing. <P><A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/dance_review.html?in_review_id=641754&in_review_text_id=612463" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 12:21 pm 
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"Cranko's Onegin has become a classic by stealth here. Long ignored by the Royal Ballet, it has crept into the repertoire almost while we were looking the other way."<P>Oh no it hasn't! Many ballet lovers were excited that this work with its wonderful pdds was to be included in the RB rep when attempts to revive it at ENB failed.


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 10:54 pm 
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Review in the Telegraph.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Last winter, Mara Galeazzi was the fourth of the casts for Onegin, John Cranko's 1965 costume tragedy that became an instant success on its acquisition by the Royal Ballet. Even then the Italian soloist proved for many a memorable Tatiana, perhaps the one you would ache for most, the one in whom the ephemerality of youth, the deceptiveness of hope, the unfairness of chance, seemed most clearly embodied. This week - owing to the high number of injuries suffered by the company this season, adding two Tatianas, Tamara Rojo and Jaimie Tapper, to its sick-list during its recent Australian tour - Galeazzi had the first night, and she took it with honours.<P> <BR><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F07%2F17%2Fbtisme17.xml" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P><BR>And in The Times.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>IT’S the end of the Royal Ballet season, the dancers are getting tired and injury is rife. During the company’s recent tour to Australia they even had to cancel a matinee because they couldn’t field a full cast. <BR>This week’s run of Onegin, which kicks off the Royal’s summer season, has been particularly hard hit with two of the company’s four Tatianas on the injury list. Last night, an approved Tatiana had to be drafted in from Stuttgart to star in Cranko’s churning, emotive ballet. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,685-358355,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B>MORE </B> </A><P>And in The Guardian.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The storytelling in Cranko's 1965 ballet Onegin is an odd mix of old-fashioned melodrama and psychological acuity. As its four leading lovers are thrust from romantic comedy into grown-up tragedy, they have to make sense of choreography that veers between feverish ranting and deeply mined feeling. Out of Monday's cast it was Mara Galeazzi, standing in for an injured Tamara Rojo as Tatiana, who found the most triumphantly coherent route through<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4462822,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 17, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2002 11:46 pm 
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Review from The FT.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><P>The Royal Ballet returned last week from an Australian tour, and began a season - safe summery pops for the tourist trade - on Monday with Cranko's Onegin. It is a work that needs a marvellous balance between incandescent performance and extreme subtlety. The choreography's emotional knife-edge must cut into the dancer's feelings, and into ours. With anything less sharp, the piece becomes more kitsch than art, Mills & Boon rather than Pushkin. So, alas, it proved on Monday.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1026916467336&p=1016625900929" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P><B>This link will only be live for 1 week. therafter it will only be available to fee-paying subscribers</B><P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited July 18, 2002).]


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