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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2002 11:01 pm 
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Review from The FT.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The Royal Ballet's staging of Don Quixote is a dismal thing. It is one of Nureyev's several views of old Barcelona, but not his last (nor his best), which is the Paris Opera version. This production, on loan from the Australian Ballet, might cause a bit of excitement on a sheep station, but in the harsher conditions of an opera house, and treated with our national troupe's sang-froid, it remains a souvenir of the Costa del Miscasting. Jollity by numbers and a determined daintiness in dancing, make for dull viewing. The piece has returned as tourist-bait at Covent Garden this week, though why not show the trippers something authentically national and worthwhile: Fille or Cinderella or Manon or, perish the thought, a triple bill of local choreography?<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1027434875525&p=1016625900929" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And from The Standard.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Carlos Acosta appeared at the Royal Opera House last night and that is almost all you need to know. ] <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/review.html?in_review_id=648002&in_review_text_id=619134" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 24, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2002 11:03 pm 
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Interview in The Telegraph with Ivan Putrov who is dancing the role of Basilio this week.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>It was a December night three years ago and I was watching my fourth Nutcracker that week, sleep-walking through the yuletide bustle of the first act, waiting for my five minutes of Sugar Plum Fairy. As the familiar pictures unfolded, something began to snag at the corner of my eye, a vivid, unexpected presence, like a rogue tulip in a municipal flowerbed. It was a young boy acting his heart out in the tiny role of Clara's dancing partner. He brought the character of the shy, adoring teenager to life and sculpted every step with love, his pointed feet and cushioned landings putting many of the featured soloists to shame. I held my programme up to the glow of the stage: it was Ivan Putrov and he was just 19.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F07%2F22%2Fbtput21.xml" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2002 10:06 pm 
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Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Review in The Telegraph.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>As an opening flourish by a new director last autumn, Ross Stretton's staging of the 19th-century classical comedy Don Quixote had to be read as a pledge to the Royal Ballet of a new era of bold colours and sensual pizzazz. It proved to be a mishmash of provincial visual taste, inept atmospheric grip and strange casting - all of which gave the Royal Ballet one of its unhappiest incarnations for years.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F07%2F25%2Fbtdon25.xml" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And in The Independent.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Acquired by the Royal Ballet last year, Nureyev's production of Don Quixote launched Ross Stretton's directorship in an atmosphere of high anticipation – and received a critical drubbing. People complained that it was too elderly (created for Stretton's Alma Mater, the Australian Ballet, in 1970), too old-fashioned (well, it is a 19th-century ballet), too provincial (take note, Australia) and that the performances lacked glitter (OK, maybe the leads did). Ten months on, the ballet returns as part of the company's three-week London stint, after their extended Australian tour (Australia does seem to be a theme these days) and before they break up for their summer holidays.<P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/reviews/story.jsp?story=318057" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 25, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2002 12:32 pm 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
An appreciative and thoughtful review by Jane Simpson on ballet.co of Laura Morera's debut in "Don Q" - a performance which is unlikely to be picked up by the national critics:<P> <A HREF="http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2917.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2917.html</A>


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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2002 12:33 am 
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Miyako Yoshida and Jonathan Cope, given their really glowing reviews last October, they were the cast I was most excited about seeing (and in the end, the only cast I would see).<P>I thought they were both terrific, probably my favourites. On paper, Yoshida and Cope sound like such an odd match. Yoshida appears smaller than she is on stage and must be almost a foot shorter than Cope. She has delicate, fine features and in contrast Cope has very striking ones and actually seems a little out of place in the whole village. I’m so used to seeing him in serious, romantic, non-smiling roles, he appeared very self-mocking and good-humoured in comparison. The way he really went for the mime and flourishes in the dance made him so endearing. And they look so good together! Their Basilo and Kitri had such a playful quality, a tender fondness for each other rather than fiery passion! He would look at Yoshida so sweetly! Their dancing is very well matched with beautiful lines and there’s something very pure and classical about it. Because of Yoshida’s small frame and Cope’s height, all of the lifts look spectacular. I really enjoyed all their scenes on stage, they were so charming, their acting unforced in spite of the pantomime-like feel of the ballet. <P>Yoshida looks joyous whenever she dances. She simply sparkles! She was coquettish without going over-the-top though apart from the perfunctory snaps at the wrist there wasn’t anything remotely Spanish about her Kitri. I just think it's criminal that she's been given so little to dance this season. She may be 36 (it occurred to me half-way that with Cope at nearly 40 they really are the seniors in the company) and she may feel herself that she's having to make way for the next generation, but I think she still gives as good as Cojocaru, Rojo, etc, etc. And it's hard to miss the amazing elevation on her jumps. She has the best jétè in the company, as high as Cope's. Yoshida has such wonderful, precise technique that makes her dancing a comfortable delight to watch. Her fouettes were bang on, no travelling at all. <P>It’s also nice to see Cope dance with someone other than Guillem or Bussell for a change. He doesn't have all the tricks that say Acosta has but that's fine. There's something so appealing and uninhibited about his dancing (to borrow a word from another poster) and it's refreshing. The only hiccup was a really scary fall by Jonathan in Act I that took him a minute to recover from, and though he looked energetic in the rest of the ballet, I hope he’s well enough to dance on Saturday. <P>Good, superficial fun, I was surprised to be really touched by Belinda Hatley as the Queen of the Dryads. Her arms, the shapes she makes with them are so soft and beautiful to watch. The way she stretches them out, they have that fluid, boneless quality to them. At the start of the garden scene, where she and Yoshida were doing a series of arabesques alongside each other, you could really see the difference, not that there was anything wrong with Yoshida’s arms at all. <P>I surprised myself in really enjoying the performance, though I have serious issues with the gypsy scene who have the most uninteresting choreography and terrible costumes imaginable. When I get to that bit I just want the panto and the battling of the windmills to be over as quickyly as possible. Likewise for the Fadango. I don't think any of the character dances worked well here. I actually quite like the Act I sets which are very pretty, but I agree the production as a whole is dreary and dark. The prologue may be the set up for the whole ballet, but the story is so trite and silly, really it could have done without it.<p>[This message has been edited by sylvia (edited July 26, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Don Quixote - Royal Ballet
PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2002 12:58 am 
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Review from The Sunday Times.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Don Quixote has historically been more often butchered for its divertissements than presented in its stamping, charging, on-the-hoof entirety, at least in this country. In principle, this is a shame, but as the curtain rises on the Royal Ballet’s full-length version you can’t help but feel your fingers twitching for a handy cleaver. The early signs are uniformly discouraging: the nicotine-stained set, the creaking jokes; the Don who, as his visionary madness increases, starts to look more and more like Baroness Thatcher; and the furry-pated, knob-horned monsters that, during the Don’s first hallucinatory glimpse of Dulcinea, bumble from the chimney like Teletubbies in bondage gear. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2101-364318,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><P>And from The Observer (scroll down article).<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The real indictment of Stretton's sense of programming was Monday night's revival of Don Quixote, a production he should've abandoned after its first outing. Any tourist seeing the company for the first time in this setting would dismiss it as irredeemably provincial. The deçor is dreary, the costumes unbecoming, the crowd scenes perfunctory. Men who were magnificent in the gala came across as pantomime toreadors and gypsies. <P><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,764289,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A><p>[This message has been edited by Joanne (edited July 28, 2002).]


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