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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 2:27 am 
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Quote:
Borrowed Light’ at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival Offers Shaker
by JOHN ROCKWELL for the New York Times

One says “based on” because this is by no means some ethnographically accurate recreation of Shaker movement and music; Mr. Saarinen has said it is more about communitarian fervor in general. The Boston singers intone these mostly solo or unison songs more roundly than on Shaker recordings I have heard, less raw and strident.

published: July 21, 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 6:57 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
‘Borrowed Light’ reflects on Shaker devotion
It’s taken two years of planning, but it’s worth the wait. Finnish choreographer Tero Saarinen has finally brought the US premiere of his Shaker-inspired “Borrowed Light” to the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, and it is illuminating indeed: a powerful, strikingly original evocation of communal devotion unlike anything this reviewer has experienced.

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 Post subject: Thoughts on "Borrowed Light"
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:50 am 
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Thoughts prompted by the matinee performance of "Borrowed Light" on Saturday, July 22.

Like Nijinsky’s Chosen One, the celebrants in Tero Saarinen’s “Borrowed Light” seek connection with the divine. Whether stricken by dark lot or haunted by ancient sin, all dance to attract the divine force that will carry them to the sweet fields of either propitiation or atonement. The weight of their fate pulls them into the earth and rends their movement heavy and awkward. All are helpless. Yet, while the Chosen One’s beating arms are, perhaps, a want for flight, the reaching arm gestures of “Borrowed Light’s” celebrants speak of a yearning for the lightness and simplicity needed to meet life as well as the divine.

While Saarinen’s work shares features with Doris Humphrey’s “Shakers,” such as the use of Shaker music and other well- known Shaker practices, it is, however, through the rhetorical power of its gestures that “Borrowed Light” at once eclipses “Shakers” yet exemplifies the importance of gesture as expressed by Humphrey in “The Art of Making Dances.” In her book, Humphrey warns choreographers that they had better have something to say and then make it intelligible. In its 70-minute course, “Borrowed Light” runs unbroken in a stream of 20 Shaker songs and solo and various group dances. And its over-all form is, based on just one viewing, progressive; that is the work began by stating the spiritual goal expressed in the song titled “In Yonder Valley” and concluded with at least a partial fulfillment of that goal with “Holy Mother’s Protecting Chain.” More important to the charge of intelligibility, however, is the basic structure of “Borrowed Light” which follows, one thinks, the rhetorical formulae of: tell what one is going to say, say it, then tell what one just said. Appropriate to its Shaker reference, the work opens with a clear statement for female soloist of its uncluttered choreographic “argument.” As the work unfolds, the opening theme is repeated and often emphasized by various groups of dancers- the work is set on 4 each male and female dancers- performing in unison. And “Borrowed Light” ends with a return of the female soloist who in addition to telling what the work just said bids the audience to follow her. She illuminated by borrowed light – a phrase invented by the Shakers to describe the natural lighting of interiors - stands in stillness facing away from the audience. “Come with me into the world of “Borrowed Light,” her pose says, “and find by our Shaker inspired example that ethics and aesthetics are one.”


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 6:58 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Danish troupe is elegant and electric
Tim Rushton’s “Silent Steps” is one of those rare dances so packed with unmitigated charm that it’s hard for a viewer to contain a grin and suppress an occasional chuckle of delight. It’s that exuberant, that exhilarating. Presented Thursday night at Jacob’s Pillow by the Danish Dance Theatre, it was one of two US premieres the superb 25-year-old company brought to the festival.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 1:25 am 
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Quote:
Danish Dance Theater Brings a Hint of Community, Set to Anguished Grandeur
by JENNIFER DUNNING for the New York Times

But there was a faint underlying hint of community that brought the work of Jiri Kylian to mind. And the idea of community came to the fore in Mr. Rushton’s haunting “Kridt” (the title is the Danish word for chalk), also an American premiere. Set to textured music of anguished grandeur by Peteris Vasks, “Kridt” also draws from Ecclesiastes, murmured in French on tape, to portray a man’s passage into death.

published: July 29, 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 6:59 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Out of Darkness
by DEBORA JOWITT for the Village Voice

Saarinen doesn't attempt an historically accurate depiction of Shaker dances or Shaker life. He doesn't separate men from women as stringently as the celibate communities did, although his dancers touch one another infrequently, and contact is often mediated by the leather belts they wear (a person may grab another's belt and be dragged across the floor). Rather than focusing on sexual tension, he turns the stage of Jacob's Pillow's Ted Shawn Theatre into a site for inner struggle and transformation.

published: August 1, 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 6:56 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Trey McIntyre Project stretches traditions
For a ballet lover in the 21st century, it is thrilling to see the art form in the hands of a skilled choreographer who can mine the traditional vocabulary for all it’s worth while imaginatively stretching its boundaries.
.... After last summer’s wildly acclaimed East Coast debut at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, the [Trey McIntyre Project] returns this year with three very different pieces. While none are groundbreaking, all are beautifully crafted and stunningly danced.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 7:58 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Armitage brings a steely edge
....
At Jacob’s Pillow this week, [Karole] Armitage is presenting excerpts from two of her most recent works. “Time is the echo of an axe within a wood,” inspired by a Philip Larkin poem, was represented by an excerpt set to Bartok’s brilliant 20th - century classic “Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta.”
....
“In this dream that dogs me,” set to a quirky original score by frequent collaborator Annie Gosfield, is far subtler and less cohesive.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 7:46 am 
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From Theodore Bale in the Boston Herald:
Quote:
Shen Wei leads fest on journey into Tibet
Chinese choreographer Shen Wei went to the mountains of Tibet in search of purity. He returned with the inspiration for an unusual dance for his New York-based company, Shen Wei Dance Arts, that it will perform at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival tonight through Sunday.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 7:23 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
At Jacob’s Pillow, Shen Wei is moving all over the ‘Map’
If Shen Wei is driven by any sort of artistic dictum, it must be something like “Keep moving forward.” The Chinese-born choreographer is resolutely experimental, amassing a body of works so strikingly original they defy categorization. And each one seems radically different from the other s -- distinctive, yet pushing boundaries in different ways....

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 7:32 am 
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From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Surrealistic video is highlight of uneven ‘Exquisite Corpse’
With all the firepower Richard Move assembled for the debut of his new project at Jacob’s Pillow this week, you’d think he’d have a sure fire hit.
....
The weakest link is the choreography itself. No matter how intriguing the artistic vision, Move’s choreography is generally not all that interesting. A fairly routine fusion of modern dance and ballet with some avant-garde touches, it feels a bit recycled and stale. It pales in comparison to Atlas’ s surrealistic video, an eye-popping compendium that has little narrative flow but gathers a kind of cumulative power.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 9:36 am 
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One that I missed earlier.

Quote:
Dancing Death
by DEBORAH JOWITT for the Village Voice

The most memorable and wrenching moments in Tim Rushton's Kridt involve very little dancing per se, although the eight members of the Danish Dance Theatre, the Copenhagen-based company Rushton directs, explode into straight-up jumps or fall slowly backward with expressive power.

published: August 4, 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:09 pm 
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A curious review of Pacific Northwest Ballet's performance at Jacobs Pillow from stringer Tresca Weinstein in the Albany Times Union. She is factually incorrect in her statement the the four works on the program predate Peter Boal's appointment as AD -- only "Lambarena" has been in the repertory longer than Peter's tenure. More curiously, we are not told the names of the performers in three of the four works on the program; at minimum, she should have identified the two dancers in "Duo Concertant" and a passing reference to the rosters of Sonia Dawkins' piece and "Lambarena" would have been at least nominally informative.

Albany Times Union


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 8:04 pm 
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Allison Tracy reviews the PNB performance in the Berkshire Eagle:

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 10:38 am 
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Roslyn Sulcas reviews PNB's performance in the New York Times:

NY Times


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