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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2000 5:31 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1689
Location: USA
So, a simplistic point would be that the dancer/dancers can define the essence of a company as well as the choreographer. The dancer/dancers can inspire or define a choreographer's work and vice versa.<P> At first, those factors become the style of the company, as the company becomes recognized, it then becomes the definition or "type" of dance for that region or company. <P>I put "type" in quotes, because I didn't want to necessarily imply a style, as in russian, or english, etc. although it is not ruled out.<p>[This message has been edited by Maggie (edited December 04, 2000).]


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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2000 7:59 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
I also think that there is some reverse influence - the country/region upon the dancers/choreographer. This was especially true in Denmark. The small stage had a marked effect upon the dance that was created there - conversely the large stage of the Bolshoi upon Russian dancers.<P>I once read an interview of Nureyev is which he said he found much in common twist Russian and American dancers. He felt that the amplitude of both "schools" was a result of the actual space - steppes/prairie - of the country. It is an interesting hypothesis.<P>I think you can see this in some of the choreography of Agnes DeMille - for Oklahoma, Rodeo, etc. There is a feeling of spaciousness - of horizons going to forever. <P>I would say, in my opinion, that there was little doubt that Nureyev enhanced the Royal Ballet (I hear screams of negation as I type this). He changed the way men danced in the 1960's - he gave a new view of how men should dance and the men of the Royal Ballet responded - sometimes angrily - but that too is a response - with greater effort and results. <P>So, too, in the more distant past the Italian ballerinas inspired Russian ballet - 32 fouettes being a case in point. But of course that was only a small part of it. Italy sent choreographers as well as dancers to the Czar's ballet school.<P>Apparently we cannot have enhancement without some dilution. That is how we all came about isn't it? <P>


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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2000 2:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 4725
Location: Australia
i don't have time for a longer post right now, but i too considered the example of nureyev at the RB, together with/in contrast to, mukhamedov at the RB.<P>i think there are choices made: which changes occur. and a choice can 'enhance' and amplify and develop the stream one is already headed on - or it can deflect/aler/change that course....<P>i am inclined to think that nureyev was a needed boost, which propelled the company along the same lines as it was intended to go, but in a revolutionary way! ( not minimising that influence). wheras mukhamedov's style is quite contrary to the values of the RB. we can love both, of course! Image

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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2001 4:50 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
'The Troublemaker.' Mindy Aloff writes a carefully considered piece in The New Republic on 'Writing in the Dark' by Arlene Croce. <P>Croce was clearly a stylish and knowledgable writer and I'm aware that she has many supporters. I have to say that I have not enjoyed some of her waspish pieces I have read. She seems to have spawned a style of criticism seen in some US critics, both professional and amateur, that at its worst is unsympathetic to dance and dance artists. <P> <A HREF="http://www.thenewrepublic.com/030501/aloff030501_print.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.thenewrepublic.com/030501/aloff030501_print.html</A> <p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited March 02, 2001).]


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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2001 11:17 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA USA
Hmmmm! Lots of food for thought! I need to read that article again. Even if one doesn't agree with Croce's stand on Bill T., Peter Martins and postmodernism, for example, she seems to "shoot from the hip" and has personal integrity in terms of not "following the crowd". Athough I dont' agree with her Bill T. stand (writing about a piece without seeing it; yes, I DO know it wasn't a review, but STILL), it's hard to dismiss 40 years of watching and reviewing dance.


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 Post subject: Re: Arlene Croce. She writes in the Dark!
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2001 3:08 pm 
I think Arlene Croce is the greatest dance critic of the second half of the 20th century before her retirement in 1996. Her work has influence in Britain too. Alastair Macaulay was her protege for a while in the 1980. There's certainly nothing wrong in Croce setting the highest standards in dance as a yardstick in her criticism.<p>[This message has been edited by Kevin Ng (edited March 03, 2001).]


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