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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2002 6:04 am 
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Posts: 921
Location: US
Here are some new summer titles for all you book lovers!<P>Jennifer Dunning writes in the NY Times:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Who is Merce Cunningham? And Mikhail Baryshnikov? Who was Rudolf Nureyev? Three handsomely produced dance books answer those questions, in pictures and in words, in varying degrees.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/31/books/31DUNN.html" TARGET=_blank><B>Click for More</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2002 1:49 am 
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In the New York Times, James R. Oestreich writes about Charles M. Joseph's book, <I>Stravinsky and Balanchine: A Journey of Invention</I>: <P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The roots of the Balanchine aesthetic and its development in his work with Stravinsky are major themes in Charles M. Joseph's "Stravinsky and Balanchine: A Journey of Invention." Mr. Joseph is a professor of music at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., where the City Ballet has spent its summers since 1966. But Stravinsky has been the main concern of Mr. Joseph's scholarship in previous books, "Stravinsky and the Piano" and "Stravinsky Inside Out," and numerous articles. In them, he gives one of the fullest accountings yet of the many scraps of information in the Stravinsky archive maintained by the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel, Switzerland: unpublished letters and documents, and material edited out of books and films by or about the composer.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/08/02/books/02BOOK.html" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Malcolm Tay (edited August 05, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2002 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Northern Virginia, USA
Dance and books -- my first loves, together!<P>My first ballet book was the fabulous Jill Krementz's <I>A Very Young Dancer</I>. I got it for Christmas in 1980. It's still one of my favorites; the photos taken at the height of the Balanchine era at NYCB are just astonishing. There are so many photos and mentions of SAB advanced students and NYCB corps dancers, too, who went on to become quite successful in their own rights.<P>And Stephanie, the main character, physically resembles me at that age enough that I can still read the book and pretend that I am her.<P>No one has mentioned another favorite of mine: <I>Shura</I>, Alexandra Danilova's autobiography. The text is fascinating but the photos -- oh the photos of the Ballet Russe!<P>I found Gelsey Kirkland to be somewhat unsympathetic in <I>Dancing on My Grave</I>. I felt bad for her, but the depths of her self destruction were such that I couldn't feel bad for her at a certain point. Yet I've seen video of her dancing... and her energy is so readily apparent even in still photographs. I was happy to read <I>The Shape of Love</I> and learn that she'd made peace with herself and with the ballet world.<BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2002 6:05 pm 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
I enjoyed "Shura" - very much. What a beautiful lady and ballerina. The quintessential Russian ballerina on a world stage. She was wonderful in The Turning Point, too.


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2002 5:59 am 
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Posts: 1638
Location: London UK
I wasn't too taken with Gelsey Kirkland's book "Dancing on my Grave" either. It was very sleazy in places and she came across as one awful whinger. I wonder if Baryshnikov and Peter Martins were really as bad as she makes out.<P>Personally I always find the kiss & tell style of biography a bit tacky. I remember when the book was first published someone asked one of the Royal Ballet principals what he thought of it. He replied: "I just thought thank God I never slept with her". Having read the book I know what he meant.<BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2002 10:23 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
Agreed. Her revelations on that subject were definitely a case of TMI.


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2002 10:43 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA USA
Yes, Basheva, I loved that book "Shura". I feel like it really captures Ms. Danilova's essence...her zest, sparkle, sophistication, and spitfire personality. It also has some great advice about dance technique and style, as well. One quote I can remember (not exact but close enough): "A pirouette is nothing more than a balance which turns".


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 4:34 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Los Angeles Times:

In 'Books,' Charlip Expresses Himself
The multi-talented dancer, choreographer, designer and author brings whimsy to the "Books Into Theater, Theater Into Books" program.


By LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER

Quote:
Remy Charlip's biography lists achievements as modern dancer, choreographer, stage director, set designer, plus a separate career as children's book author and illustrator.

A sense of serious whimsy links many of these pursuits and it loomed large on Sunday in the San Francisco-based Charlip's retrospective program "Books Into Theater, Theater Into Books" at the Mark Taper Auditorium of the L.A. Central Library downtown.

Born in 1929, Charlip danced for Postmodern precursor Merce Cunningham in the 1950s. But his own choreography has often included as many facial expressions as steps because, as he explained Sunday, "with Merce, we never used our faces."
MORE...


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2002 5:22 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
There are several dance/music books reviewed here, so please scroll down so you can see all of them.

From the Boston Globe:

Men of music, art, and movement

ART/DANCE HISTORY

By Christine Temin, Globe Staff, 8/25/2002

Quote:
Tchaikovsky took orders. The choreographer Marius Petipa would dictate - ''At the rise of the curtain, a salon march for the entrance of the lords and ladies'' - and the composer complied.

John Cage and Merce Cunningham created sound and dance separately, sometimes putting them together only at the dress rehearsal, cherishing the chance effects.
MORE...


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2002 3:35 pm 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Here is an interesting site - when you get there type in "Ballet" in the search engine.

Amidst a great deal of things for kids like ballet coloring books, cut-outs, stickers, bookmarks, etc,. there is also ballet origami, complete musical scores of ballets, as well as the history of the ballet (Four Centuries...) by Lincoln Kirsten, a book of Romantic Era lithographs (those lovely things), as well as the exceedingly worthwhile "Technical Manual and Dictionary of the Classical Ballet" by Gail Grant.

This could be a very interesting site for gifts....to others, and yourself. (myself too!)

Dover Publications


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 Post subject: Re: Booklovers Only
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2002 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
I love all the different types of paper dolls there are. I notice that the great romantic ballerinas are drawn with normal human feet -- well, as close to normal as a ballet dancer's feet can be, anyway. I had a set of ballerina paper dolls in the '50s, and their costumes clearly looked like the costumes in ballet companies of that period. However, I preferred making my own from tracing dancers in souvenir programs, and then creating my own costumes.

There's even a book of modern dance paper dolls at this website, but they're famous dancers of the past -- no Garth Fagan or Urban Bush Women.


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