public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:16 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2004 5:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Watching synchronised diving for the first time, it was clear that this was a sport that had closer affinities to dance than most, both in terms of carrying out complex moves in unison and the poise, centering etc that are essential for both diving and dance. The complex dives can be seen in the light of ballet sequences such as fouettées.

In a TV interview last night, one of the UK silver medallists described the value of ballet in his training, which made sense to me in the light of above.

In The Times today, this theme is revisited:

Quote:
Last night, with his medal hanging proudly round his neck, [Waterfield reflected on a recent injury to his ankle which almost cost the pair their chance of any medal. [Peter] Waterfield suffered the injury doing ballet, his second passion, but three weeks in plaster at a critical time of the season left Taylor and Waterfield short of time in their final preparations for the Games.
The rest of the article is about diving, but here is the link for reference:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,1-527-1217522,00.html


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2004 12:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Bayanihan dance company
From The Manila Bulletin

The world renowned Bayanihan, or the Philippine National Dance Company, will be performing in Athens, Greece, during the Olympic Games.

The Bayanihan is among the national performance artists from various countries invited to participate in a festival of cultures tagged "Celebrate Cultures" by Panos Loukakos, Deputy Mayor of the Municipality of Athens.

Scheduled Aug. 13-31, "Celebrate Cultures" is intended to showcase the various cultures of participating countries through performances at several venues simultaneously with the Games.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Tue Aug 17, 2004 2:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Olympics Diary
Ballet plays its part in sporting poise.
From The Independent

Forget about synchronised swimming and beach volleyball. Forget golf, or bridge, or whatever other pursuit is the latest to be recommended for inclusion in the Olympic Games. No, the future of the Olympics is ballet.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2004 4:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Olympics Choreographer a Sensation

By TOULA VLAHOU
Associated Press via Hartford Courant
August 25, 2004

"Let's see what happens later on before we can call it a success," he said.

Sunday's Olympics finale will focus on the Greeks' love of the "glendi" or celebration through traditional dances, vastly different in tone and character than the intensely artistic opening.
more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2004 12:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Sounds as though it could be quite something:

Greece gets ready to dance in moonlight
ATHENS — The Greeks certainly know how to party and they want to prove it to the world tonight. From The Times of Oman

After a triumphant Olympics that have confounded the pessimists, the spiritual homeland of the Games is determined to go out in style.

With the Olympic torch now passing to Beijing for the 2008 Games, famed Chinese film director Zhang Yimou has promised to dazzle the Athens crowd with a “fusion of Chinese heritage and youth culture”.

He was not giving anything away in advance but said the costumes of the 270 Chinese dancers and acrobats were created by the costume designer for the worldwide hit martial arts film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2004 5:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
I'm enjoying the Rhythmic Gymnastics which can lay claim to be the danciest of the Olympic sports with its jetés, pirouettes, attitudes and even fouettes from one competitor. Apparently the competitors are at the barre everyday. It's all on demi-pointe, but some are so high that you have to look hard to see that they're not actually on pointe. The standard on display was simply stunning.

Best of the different disciplines for me, and they say the hardest, is the ribbon dance. On several occasions I had a sensation similar to those I get at fine stage dance performances. The Spaniard who came 8th looked the most interesting from a pure dance perspective as the extensions tended not to go beyond the typical 190-210 degrees.

One point surprised me - the commentator pointed out that this is all performed on an unsprung floor and I worry for the long-term effect of all those impacts.

<small>[ 29 August 2004, 03:07 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2004 10:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
Stuart, are you sure the term used was "sprung floor" and not "spring floor"? So-called "artistic gymnastics," or floor exercise, which includes high-impact tumbling passes, has for a number of years been performed on a spring floor -- a platform which literally rests on springs. Rhythmic gymnastics is typically performed on a floor consisting of tumbling mats, which can be covered by carpeting. Having danced on such a surface for 2 years, I can assure you that it is very gentle on the body.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2004 1:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
All that makes a lot of sense djb and it may well be that I misheard, especially as the phrases "spring floor" and "artistic gymnastics" I had not heard before today, although the latter was also mentioned by the commentator.

Good to hear that the floor covering is kind to the competitors.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Los Angeles
Re: Rhythmic gymnastics, the term I know is springboard floor, used for artistic gymnastics (the men's and women's gymnastics with tumbling passes in the floor routines) as well as men's rhythmic (which also has tumbling - it's not an olympic sport so you may not have seen it).

Women rhythmic gymnasts use a carpet with varying degrees of padding - often I've seen more padding in practice venues than competition. Less padding is better for turns but hard on the body for "fish flops", forward rolls and other elements where the body has contact with the floor. On the rare occasions that rhythmic gymnasts have to practice or compete on springboard floors, they are prone to ankle injuries - I think this is from landing leaps.

The best rhythmic gymnasts are those who can incorporate dance in their routines, but unfortunately in the interest of higher scores, many abandon dance in order to pack in difficult elements. There is likely to be a change in the code of points on which the sport is scored within the next year which many hope will restore more dance to rhythmic gymnastics.

If you are interested in the elements which make up this sport, including many from ballet, this website has a lot of information: http://cop2003.nucurve.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2004 2:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
Sirene, is springboard floor just another name for a spring floor, or is it a different construction? I tried to find a description of what a springboard floor is and couldn't, at least not in connection with gymnastics. However, I learned that a spring floor can rest on either coil springs or polyethylene foam blocks.

My introduction to spring floors was in 1980, when I spent a weekend helping the owners of a gymnastics school pack spring floor kits, which they had recently started to distribute. Maybe these same spring floors are more commonly called springboard floors now, but my google search turned up far more references to spring floors.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2004 3:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
Stuart, I wish I'd seen the Spanish gymnast you mentioned, if her extensions weren't as extreme as the others. (I think that's what you meant -- not going beyong 190-210 degrees still sounds pretty extreme, though.) What still keeps me from finding any type of competitive gymnastics artistic is the fact that the competitors have to demonstrate "amplitude" constantly. When every movement has to be done to the extreme, it doesn't leave much room for subtlety.

It's interesting to note how the common body type of artistic gymnasts these days is so different from that of rhythmic gymnasts. The former tends to be the "bulldog" build, which works well for tumbling, and the latter is the Sylvie Guillem type. I preferred watching both many years ago, when there was more variety in body types in each discipline.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2004 5:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
The hyper-flexibility was particularly noticable in their grands jetés. Here's an image of the silver medalist:

http://www.athens2004.com/Images/Sport%20Gallery/Gymnastics%20Rhythmic/29%20August%202004/51086879SF012_GYR_inallfinl.jpg

<small>[ 30 August 2004, 07:19 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2004 12:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Los Angeles
Besides amplitude, having a "fixed shape" is important for rhythmic gymnastics. So the flow is often interrupted when each element has to be defined in order for it to count (the best gymnasts can flow thorugh this, though).

Another difference is that many gymnasts are "turned in" instead of "turned out" and the flexibility is forced in a way that often produces injury.

An exception is the Ukrainian gymnasts who have intense training in ballet, and who present as more elegant and balletic (Anna Bessonova's Swan Lake hoop routine at the Olympics, for example).

In the Junior Olympic and national levels in the US, gymnasts who are not concerned with medals and placements take more risks artistically, I've seen gymnasts incorporate modern and jazz dance moves in their routines (with appropriate music) even though the elements don't get credited - makes for much more varied routines and more fun to watch.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dance and the Olympics 2004
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2004 5:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Music and dance events for the Paralympic Games start at the Athens Megaro
From The Athens Olympics website

Today is the opening day of the music and dance events specially for the Paralympic Games, at the Athens Concert Hall (Megaron Moussikis). The programme of events, featuring leading artists from Greece and abroad, was compiled by Thanos Mikroutsikos, cultural adviser to ATHENS 2004, and the company’s culture department.

The events include ‘Voicelifting’, a competition for composers of children’s songs, and the world premiθre of Monogramma (for soloist, mixed choir and orchestra) by the Greek composer Giorgos Kouroupos, based on the work of the Greek Nobel prizewinning poet Elytis.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group